26 Jan

Five new rectors prepare to welcome students

first_img“Being able to accompany young women is an honor,” she said. “My overall goal is to be present for the students.” “Each dorm is so unique,” she said. “It’s a whole new set of traditions, people and building.” Annie Selak, Walsh Hall rector, said her goals for the dorm include helping the community grow within the dorm’s walls. “[The past few weeks] have been very busy,” she said. “We’ve had training. It’s been wonderful to meet people at Notre Dame.” Lewis Hall rector Layla Karst also graduated from Notre Dame in May with a Master of Divinity. She said her goal for the year is to learn about the community of Lewis.  She said she cries every time she watches Rudy and enjoys riding an all-terrain vehicle with her nephew while on holidays in her hometown of Pottsville, Pa.  “We’re all different,” she said. “We have to work at being an inclusive community. The girls will appreciate being wonderful and created by God.” “I want to make sure to have the strongest community we can,” she said. “I want to build upon what we already have here.” Students in Cavanaugh Hall, Lewis Hall, Pasquerilla West Hall, Sorin College and Walsh Hall will see new leadership in the dorm this year. “I’d encourage people to see the entire value of the relationships they build here,” he said. “I always call everyone ‘girls,’ no matter how old. It’s a youthful heart,” she said. “We all want that youthful heart.” Notre Dame is home to five new rectors this fall. He also said the dorm’s traditions foster important relationships. She said the hardest adjustment has been the college culture and time schedule.“I thought I was a night person — forget about it,” she said. An internship in spiritual direction during her education at the Catholic Theology University in Chicago changed her life, Hahner said. She also wants to work with Campus Ministry. Fr. Robert Loughery, known as Fr. Bob, joined Facebook as part of the effort to lead Sorin College.  The new rector of Pasquerilla West Hall, Sr. Mary Jane Hahner, said she ended up at Notre Dame because she wanted to work in ministry.  Maria Hinton, the new rector of Cavanaugh Hall, might have a better idea of the student schedule. A “double domer,” she graduated from the Notre Dame Law School in May and was an assistant rector in Lyons Hall for two years. Selak, who has lived all her life in California except for a year in Detroit, graduated from Santa Clara University and majored in religious studies and political science. She received her Master of Divinity at the Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley. “It feels like coming home,” he said. “I want to share what I’ve experienced,” he said. “Faith calls service. I would like to somehow invite residents to continue and expand this awareness in the dorm.” “I want to know who makes up the community and bring out gifts and talents,” she said. She said she loves to travel on breaks. Originally from Idaho Falls, Idaho, she went to Whitworth College — now Whitworth University — in Spokane, Wash. She was an assistant rector in Pasquerilla East Hall for two years before becoming a rector. Loughery was born and raised in Indianapolis and graduated from Notre Dame in 1979 with a degree in architecture. He lived in Sorin as an undergraduate student.last_img read more

26 Jan

Group participates in NaNoWriMo

first_imgEvery November, writers across the country put pen to paper in hopes of reaching 50,000 words during National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo). Second-year MFA student Betsy Cornwell is leading aspiring Notre Dame novelists in an on-campus writing group. Cornwell first participated in NaNoWriMo in 2008 when she was a junior undergraduate. “The draft I wrote in 2008, I am just now getting a book deal on,” she said. “Two publishing houses are actually bidding on it. This year, I’m doing a steam punk version of Cinderella and actually the publishing houses have offered preemptively on this one as well.” Cornwell’s book that is currently being bid on is a young adult magical realism book, called “Tides.” “I was working at a teen magazine at the time, and we got all these letters about how they either hated things like Twilight or they liked it, but wanted to make it more literary,” she said. “I said, ‘You know what, I agree, I’m going to try to do that.’” Cornwell teaches a fiction-writing course and has encouraged her students to participate. Of her 15 students, 10 have chosen to write 50,000 words this November instead of turning in a final portfolio of all their work. “I really encourage people to do it, because you write this messy bad draft, and then you revise it,” she said. Cornwell said she believes people who have never written a novel or have no idea how to approach fiction writing benefit the most from NaNoWriMo. “People who think this is a big impossible thing, because it really is about plunging in without knowing what you’re doing and forcing yourself to do it,” she said. One of Cornwell’s students, senior Darsie Malynn decided to attempt the 50,000 word challenge. “I am attempting to do NaNoWriMo because it seems like a cool, challenging and rewarding project,” Malynn said. “Also if we do it, we are not required to turn in a final portfolio for our class, so it’s hopefully not a completely unmanageable amount of writing.” Malynn is not the only student participating this month. Junior Leah Coming, the president of Notre Dame’s creative writing club, Mustard, is participating in her own way. “Mustard traditionally has done a couple write-ins during NaNoWriMo, but usually members do it on his or her own,” she said. Coming said she uses her capacity as president of Mustard to help spread the word about more structured write-ins led by Cornwell in the University Writing Center. When Coming is not helping Cornwell get the word out about NaNoWriMo, she will also take part. “I’m doing pansy NaNo,” she said. “I’m only doing 15,000 words [this November].” Coming said she decided to do a smaller word count because she is already working on a large project that she has chosen to extend during NaNoWriMo. “Usually when people do a NaNo, they come up with a crazy new plot, the plot twists and turns and they write total nonsense to get to the word count,” Coming said. “I figured if I reduced it, I would not be writing total nonsense to get the count.”last_img read more

26 Jan

Council discusses ND gameday music

first_imgFollowing Saturday’s modified canned, or recorded, music usage during the football game, the Council of Representatives focused its Tuesday meeting on reviewing student feedback and debating changes. Student body president Pat McCormick outlined what he perceived to be the general consensus on campus. “For those who follow the viewpoints and general conversation, there seem to be two general views,” McCormick said. “One, that this is part of a longer trajectory that will put us in a place to modernize the Notre Dame football experience while maintaining tradition; and another that says we should prioritize tradition and continue to make that a principal focus.” McCormick said student government could help find a compromise between the diverging perspectives. “It looks like we may take a more assertive role in offering feedback to Gameday Operations,” he said. “There’s a huge opportunity to find middle ground here … How do we maintain tradition while creating the best, competitive environment for our team?” At last week’s meeting, representatives discussed the implications of the canned music on the band members. First Undergraduate Experience in Leadership (FUEL) director Ricky Bevington outlined the results of a survey sent to the band. “It appeared that they kind of had a mixed review on the situation just like the rest of the student body,” Bevington said. “The important thing to the band is that, because they’re part of the gameday experience, they should be part of the discussion. We need to make sure the gameday experience is more than just an athletic thing, that it considers a lot of students on campus.” Sophomore class president Nicholas Schilling offered some of the opinions he had personally gathered from band members. “One guy said he doesn’t want to get out there and bust his butt every night for a week just to have AC/DC play over him,” he said. “The other recurring theme was the concern that when you start [changing gameday music traditions], where and how do you stop?” Junior class president Kevin Doherty said the band was not the only group on the field affected by the music. “I noticed that when the canned music was playing, the players got more excited … I don’t see that as much with just the band on the field,” he said. “If we’re talking about interest groups to look at, I think players on the field are important.” McCormick said Doherty’s observation was evident in player interviews. “Player excitement is supported by post-game interviews,” he said. “They commented that the atmosphere was much more electric and the canned music seemed to contribute to that.” Schilling argued for tradition over modernization. “I guess I’m more of a purist in that I’m going to take the band over Guns ‘n Roses or AC/DC any day,” he said. “The band is what makes Notre Dame different.”last_img read more

26 Jan

Academic Affairs presents new series

first_imgStudents now have an opportunity to hear from professors outside of the classroom through the First and Last Lecture Series. The Department of Academic Affairs invites professors every semester to speak as if it were their first or last lecture at the University. Sydney Zepf, the coordinator for Last Lectures, said this is a great way for students to learn from professors in a new way. “We ask professors to imagine what they would say if they could only give one more lecture in their life, and then give them the opportunity to present it to students,” she said. “This lecture series is unique because it allows students to hear from professors about something other than the professor’s traditional area of study.” Often, professors lecture on important lessons that they have learned throughout their careers, Zepf said. “Professors tend to lecture about the ways that they have gained their success and important lessons that they have learned. However, the time of the lecture is completely theirs – we give professors no restrictions.” While anyone can attend these lectures, the series serves as a connection between students and professors, Zepf said. “This lecture series is beneficial for the ND community because it gives students an opportunity to take advantage of the knowledge of their teachers in a new way.  It also serves to bridge the gap between professors and students and to help students get to know their professors in a new way. Many professors have amazing stories that students just don’t get to hear in a classroom setting. “ These lectures are held twice a year, and anyone is allowed to attend, Zepf said. The First Lecture series is a new addition to the Academic Affairs Department. Timothy Kirchoff, the coordinator for First Lectures, said this series gives students the opportunity to listen to new professors talk about their fields of specialty, and why they came to the University. “It seems to me that, when a professor comes to Notre Dame specifically in order to participate in Notre Dame’s mission as a Catholic University, we should take note of that in some way, and that is what the First Lecture is designed to do,” he said. “It is an opportunity for a professor to discuss their field of expertise and why they wanted to come to Notre Dame – to place their own work in the context of Notre Dame’s mission as an institution that seeks to bring faith and reason into conversation.” The Notre Dame identity is an integral part of this series, Kirchoff said. “Maybe this is a cliched line, but Notre Dame is a unique institution, and professors – like many students – come here believing that they can be part of something truly special. They are not just joining the faculty of one of America’s top universities, but the faculty of a uniquely Catholic university,” he said. These lectures may also have many benefits for the future, Kirchoff said. Specifically, he said he hopes to see the First and Last Lectures set a precedent for student-professor engagement outside the classroom. “If each individual First Lecture sends the message to the speaker that students are interested in this kind of engagement and encourages both the speaker and students to pursue it more deliberately, I would consider it a success. As a series, though, I would like the First Lecture to help both students and professors develop a deeper appreciation for and willingness to participate in Notre Dame’s unique identity and mission,” Kirchoff said. The First Lecture series begins with a talk from Professor Deneen of the Department of Political Science on Nov. 11.last_img read more

26 Jan

Saint Mary’s formal features Hepburn theme

first_imgSaint Mary’s students channeled their inner Aubrey Hepburn on Friday at the “Splash of Class” all-school formal held at the Hilton Garden Inn. Photo courtesy of Lauren Wells The Saint Mary’s annual all-school formal incorporated an Audrey Hepburn theme.First year Jessica Alberts attended the formal and said the dance provided opportunities for bonding.“It was a great time for good friends and great memories,” Alberts said. “It was so much fun to be yourself and dance with your friends. It was nice to see everyone dressed up and look so classy.”Junior Lauren Wells, who organized the dance as the formal chair of the Residence Hall Association (RHA), has helped plan the event for three years.“I definitely see it as our most successful year thus far,” Wells said. “We [had] some incredible decorations, a free photo booth, hot chocolate bar … and of course we cannot forget the life-size Audrey Hepburn cut-out.”Wells said the formal requires months of preparation.“My co-president Maureen Malarney and myself selected our committee in September, and then we went from there,” Wells said.Wells said the classy theme played off the well-known “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.”“Being an all-girls school, we have a creative license to do themes that would tend to be more girly,” Wells said.Junior Lauren Lindbloom expressed how much she enjoyed the theme of the night.“I love Tiffany’s stuff, so I thought it was really cute, and I thought they did a really good job of decorating,” Lindbloom said.First year Susan Kratzer said her first formal experience surpassed her expectations.“I didn’t know how many people would be there or what to expect,” Kratzer said, “But it ended up being a lot of fun just being with my friends.”Lindbloom also said the formal is a good night for building relationships with fellow Saint Mary’s students.“I think it is good for our sisterhood,” Lindbloom said.Wells said praised her committee for its attention to detail and hard work that went into choosing the theme and organizing the event.Tags: breakfast at tiffany’s dance, formal at saint mary’s, saint mary’s all school formal, saint mary’s formal, splash of classlast_img read more

26 Jan

Residence halls welcome freshmen to Notre Dame

first_imgCaitlyn Jordan | The Observer First-year students pray and light candles during their first class trip to the Grotto, one of many orientation activities planned for Welcome Weekend.Several Ryan freshmen said they were apprehensive about classes starting. Freshman Julia Forte said she was looking forward to the first day. “We’re excited and nervous for the first day of classes,” Forte said.Williams said working for the Welcome Weekend team has made her more excited about starting school. “Working Welcome Weekend definitely made me more excited for the school year because it gave me the chance to meet all of the first years,” Williams said. “It was a bit overwhelming having so much to do and being exhausted, but it was so much fun.” Tags: Move-in, Ryan Hall, Sorin College, Welcome Weekend After a hectic weekend, filled with move-ins, ice-breakers and family goodbyes, sophomore Fiona Williams said she was “really happy” with how move-in went in Ryan Hall.  Caitlyn Jordan | The Observer First-Year students in Saint Edward’s Hall attend DomerFest on Saturday. Students participated in numerous activities during Welcome Weekend as they transitioned to life on campus.“The team worked quickly and efficiently, moving in all 78 first years — and everyone was moved in before the rain came,” Williams said. Williams served as a co-captain for the Ryan Hall Welcome Weekend team this year, and she said was grateful for the help of their brother dorm’s Welcome Weekend team. “It was also nice that some of the Duncan Team came to help with move-in,” she said. Freshman Caroline Nassab, one of Williams’ charges in Ryan Hall, said the weekend was fun for her and her fellow freshmen. “The weekend was awesome but very tiring and busy,” Nassab said. The freshmen of Ryan Hall went ice skating with the freshmen from Sorin College on Saturday, which Williams said was her favorite part of the weekend. “For some of the first years, it was their first time skating, so it was so special for me to see them all having a great time,” Williams said. It was one of freshman Abigail Kovar’s favorite events of Welcome Weekend.“We loved ice skating with Sorin — it was so much fun, and a nice different event,” Kovar said.Williams said she thought DomerFest, an annual freshmen dance and mixer with music, games and food, went well. Williams said she was pleased with the outcome, despite low expectations from some of the first years. “I also had a lot of First Years tell me DomerFest was better than they thought it would be,” Williams said. “They had a good time meeting everyone from the dorms we didn’t get to have events with.”last_img read more

26 Jan

Political Speed Dating aims to spark civil discourse

first_imgTags: BridgeND, civil discourse, Political Speed Dating Students across the political spectrum will have the opportunity to meet Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. for the 3rd annual Political Speed Dating to engage in political discourse. Hosted by BridgeND, a nonpartisan organization that seeks to provide a platform of diverse political opinions, this event offers students the opportunity to express their ideologies within a relatively contained setting, the club’s officers said.“We’re wanting to reach out to a variety of students from all different colleges to create a wide audience of political discussion from all different angles,” junior Christian McGrew, president of BridgeND, said.At the event, students will be put into groups of four to five where they will be provided with a prompt and then allotted several minutes to discuss among themselves. These prompts will vary in range of social, economic, political and international scope, McGrew said. Established in 2014, BridgeND preceded BridgeUSA, which was co-founded by Courtlyn Carpenter and Leigh Francia of the University of Colorado-Boulder, class of 2016 Notre Dame alumnus Patrick Kearney and current Notre Dame senior Roge Karma. BridgeUSA, which was then founded in the fall of 2015, now serves as an umbrella organization with chapters at multiple college campuses.Karma said the purpose of BridgeND was to empower students and meet the needs of the campus. He cited political apathy as the root of Notre Dame’s disconnect. In the past, Political Speed Dating has been held in the ballroom of LaFortune Student Center. But this year, it will take place in the Oak Room above South Dining Hall. Junior Kylie Ruscheinski, vice-president of BridgeND, said the group looks forward to seeing the effects the new venue has on the success of the event and hopes to build on the positive feedback it has received the past two years. “A lot of studies have suggested that you’re more likely to have a respectful conversation in a formal setting where you have to look each other in the eyes,” she said. “It helps open up the possibility of sharing your beliefs.”Karma said the main objective of Political Speed Dating is to define the foundation of responsible political discourse. “With the right to voice my opinions comes the responsibility to actively listen and entertain others’ opinions,” he said. Ruscheinski said the success of the local chapter — as well as the growth of the national organization — is proof of students’ desire for a place on campus where they can meet to discuss different viewpoints.“Political Speed Dating is a great way to get your first step into that realm of discussing politics,”Ruscheinski said. “It’s set up to be less intimidating than sitting in a class lecture and speaking your mind.”The event will allow students to engage in dialogue and seek solutions to important political issues, Karma said.“Political Speed Dating is about creating a culture that encourages talking about controversial issues,” he said. “The community makes it feel comfortable to express your beliefs, and when people contribute their opinions, they’re actually benefitting those around them. The first step to coming up with solutions to these issues is to talk about them.”last_img read more

26 Jan

Rape reported to University

first_imgA rape was reported to a University administrator Sept. 13, according to the Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) crime log for Thursday.The alleged rape occurred Aug. 25 in a “north side” women’s residence hall, according to the entry.The incident did not appear in the crime log for almost a full month after it was reported. When asked about the timing of the posting, the University had no additional information to provide.Information about sexual assault prevention and resources for survivors of sexual assault are available online from NDSP and from the Title IX office.Tags: NDSP crime log, rape, sexual assault, Title IXlast_img read more

26 Jan

2017 Student Government Insider

first_imgTags: 2017 Student Government Insider, blais-shewit, Board of Trustees report, campus drinking culture, First-Year Class Council, freshman class council, Hall President Council, HPC, junior class council, Monthly Mingle, Notre Dame Student Senate, Oppman-Lorenc, senior class council, sophomore class council, Student Union Board, SUB, sustainability, tedx Lauren Weldon and Chris Collins | The Observer Blais, Shewit reflect on first half of term, discuss ongoing projectsOppman, Lorenc check in on goals, evaluate progress thus farDirectors of student life organize TEDx event at Notre DameSaint Mary’s committee builds on Monthly Mingle initiativeStudent government conducts research on drinking culture at Notre DameStudent government association implements sustainable practices at Saint Mary’sSenators support student groups, work to pass resolutionsStudent Union Board brings back concerts, increases programmingHall President Council updates Rocknes, evaluates Hall of the Year selection process2017 Notre Dame class council reviews2017 Saint Mary’s class council reviews2017 student government department reviews2017 student government association committee reviewslast_img read more

26 Jan

IDEA Center hosts webinar with Fortune ‘40 Under 40’ entrepreneur

first_imgHelen Adeosun ’07, CEO and founder of CareAcademy, a digital training platform that trains thousands of caregivers, shared her entrepreneurship journey and tips for success via a Zoom webinar Friday.Following a brief introduction from vice president and associate provost for innovation Bryan Ritchie, Adeosun took the virtual stage to share her experiences as an entrepreneur.After immigrating from Nigeria as a child, attending Notre Dame for her undergraduate degree, working at a public school in Atlanta, fighting for education accessibility in Washington D.C. and earning a master’s in education from Harvard University, Adeosun now owns and operates her own company at the age of 35.Adeosun recently secured $13 million in funding for CareAcademy and was named one of Fortune Magazine’s top ‘40 Under 40’ entrepreneurs in healthcare.Despite this success, Adeosun emphasized the importance of grace and providence throughout her journey and gives two main pieces of advice to current and future entrepreneurs – ask questions and cultivate a narrative.“A lot of what I have done is by grace,” Adeosun said in the webinar, “I try not to sugarcoat.”Reflecting on her childhood and journey to success, Adeosun mentioned the important role her family and her culture played in shaping her perspective on education.Adeosun said Nigerian culture places a strong emphasis on the importance of education. She also described how her father would constantly encourage her to be curious and ask questions about the world.“My parents raised a nerd, but I think that’s a key pillar of entrepreneurship,” she noted.During her years working as a teacher in the Atlanta public-school system, Adeosun gained an even greater appreciation for education.“I think I learned more from my kids than I taught my kids,” Adeosun said in reference to her students in Atlanta.Teaching students in the Atlanta public schools gave her a new appreciation for how her family guided her down the right path of education and instilled a love of curiosity within her.“By grace,” Adeosun said, “people in my life encouraged education in the important years between fourteen and eighteen.”Adeosun’s family also influenced her interest in the healthcare sector. Both of her parents worked in healthcare, and many of her other family members are doctors or nurses. Adeosun herself has some experience as a caregiver. Through CareAcademy, she hopes to increase access to care that is cost-effective, compassionate and personal.Her vision of healthcare leaves flexibility for caregivers who provide more holistic care, in some ways mirroring the town doctor model when village physicians would make house calls to provide care.She believes this aspect of her mission aligns with the current shift in healthcare away from hospital-only care toward more flexible options.“Direct care workers are becoming part of healthcare ecosystem,” Adeosun said.When the coronavirus forced many in-person businesses to shut down, the importance of online healthcare education options grew even more pronounced.Accordingly, another facet of Adeosun’s vision involves bridging the gap between human resources and technology.Adeosun credits these two recent developments for their contributions to CareAcademy’s success.Regardless of these happenstance trends, Adeosun’s constant efforts to network and build her company have paid off in the long run.“My MBAs come in real time through CareAcademy,” Adeosun said.Whether it’s a chit-chat over coffee or her weekly Saturday networking with one entrepreneur who’s just starting and one who’s further along, Adeosun said she puts in the hard work to build relationships and find the right people for her team.She has also devoted a lot of time to building her narrative, or business pitch, in order to secure investments.In her own words, “narrative is the first currency of entrepreneurship.”Adeosun believes entrepreneurs need to show stakeholders, investors, advisors, mentors and employees why they should be a part of the entrepreneur’s vision for the company.Scrapping together the capital to get a business idea off the ground is always difficult, which is why a strong narrative is vital, especially for entrepreneurs who are often underestimated or those who face discrimination.“Enterprising is hard to begin with,” Adeosun said, “and almost zero percent of funding is provided to black and brown women.”Adeosun also emphasizes the immense amount of work inherent in entrepreneurship. She says that there’s no overnight miracles and credits her own success to constant efforts to network and grow her company.“There’s a lot of excitement around entrepreneurship,” Adeosun said, “but l try to keep what I say have to say very practical.”There’s no easy path to building a company from scratch. Instead, Adeosun identifies the willingness to do what others won’t as exactly what sets an entrepreneur apart.Even Adeosun’s own family members casted doubts on her vision for CareAcademy in its early stages.“My family would ask me, ’Why are you expending so much energy in creating something that doesn’t exist?’” Adeosun said.With hard work to cultivate her narrative, commitment to expanding her network, and a little bit of grace, Adeosun managed to overcome many obstacles and find investors willing to place their bets on CareAcademy.To those who want to follow in her footsteps, and especially to entrepreneurs underestimate themselves, Adeosun said, “build communities, build relationships and be intentional about that.”Tags: CareAcademy, entrepreneur, Helen Adeosun, IDEA Centerlast_img read more