31 Dec

China Pollution Goals To Cut Coal Consumption

first_imgChina Pollution Goals To Cut Coal Consumption FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:SHANGHAI—China’s heavily polluted industrial province of Hebei has pledged to cut concentrations of hazardous smog particles by 14 percent by 2020, part of China’s ongoing efforts to improve air quality in the region.Following a meeting this week, the provincial government promised to cut small, airborne particles known as PM2.5 to an average of 57 micrograms per cubic metre by 2020, down from 65 micrograms in 2017, according to a notice issued by the local environmental bureau on Thursday.Smog-prone Hebei, which surrounds the capital Beijing, is a major front in China’s ongoing “war on pollution,” and it is desperate to promote cleaner forms of growth and cut fossil fuel use, especially coal.The province has been under heavy pressure to bring smog under control this winter, shutting factories, curbing traffic and converting coal-fired heating boilers as part of a state anti-pollution drive that committed 28 northern Chinese cities to reduce PM2.5 concentrations by at least 15 percent from October 2017 to March 2018.Hebei, China’s biggest steel-producing region, also said this week that it would accelerate efforts to restructure its heavy industrial economy, promote innovation, expand tourism and service sectors and increase forestation in the next three years.The province aims to raise the share of non-fossil fuels in its total primary energy mix to 10 percent by 2020, up from 5 percent in 2015 – still falling short of the national target of 15 percent for the period.More: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-pollution-hebei/chinas-hebei-pledges-to-cut-pollution-by-14-percent-by-2020-idUSKBN1EU07Wlast_img read more

19 Oct

Global coronavirus cases reach over 8 million as outbreak expands in Latin America

first_imgTopics : Global cases of the novel coronavirus reached over 8 million on Monday, as infections surge in Latin America and the United States and China grapple with fresh outbreaks.The United States still leads the world with the highest number of infections, about 2 million or 25% of all reported cases. However, the outbreak is growing fastest in Latin America, which now accounts for 21% of all cases, according to a Reuters tally.Brazil’s COVID-19 cases and deaths have surged to make it the No.2 hot spot in the world. The first case was reported in China in early January and it took until early May to reach 4 million cases. It has taken just five weeks to double to 8 million cases, according to a Reuters tally.Global deaths stand at over 434,000 and have doubled in seven weeks.Although Brazil’s official death toll from the pandemic has risen to nearly 44,000, the true impact is likely far greater than the data show, health experts said, citing a lack of widespread testing in Latin America’s largest country.In the United States, which has over 116,000 deaths, testing is still ramping up months after the start of the outbreak.center_img After cases declined in much of the United States for weeks, many areas are now reporting record new cases and hospitalizations. Fears of a second wave in hard-hit states – or a failure to get a grip on the first wave in some others – have led health experts to plead with the public to wear masks, avoid large gatherings and maintain social distance.China is also grappling with a resurgence of the virus just as its economy is trying to recover from shutdowns earlier this year. After nearly two months with no new infections, the capital Beijing has seen a spike in cases linked to the biggest wholesale food market in Asia.last_img read more

20 Sep

Put It Down: Texting While Driving Outlawed in Florida

first_imgThe Florida House of Representatives voted 108-7 Monday to make texting while driving a primary offense in the state of Florida, punishable by up to $60 for initial offenses plus court costs.The bill also makes school zones and road work areas ‘hands free zones’ where motorists must use speaker or Bluetooth if making a call.Governor DeSantis is expected to sign the measure.“Distracted driving has become an epidemic and I thank my colleagues in both the Senate and House for passing this much needed common-sense legislation,” Rep. Jackie Toledo of Tampa said on the house floor.Under current law a driver may only be cited for texting and driving if another offense, such as speeding or reckless driving were committed.The new law will allow law enforcement to effect a traffic stop if a driver is seen texting behind the wheelA first offense will cost a violator $30, followed by $60 for the second offense plus court costs.The new law will go into effect on July 1, however only warnings will be issued to offending motorists until Jan. 1 of 2020.last_img read more