11 Aug

About that depth… With Earl Watford and John Wetze

first_imgAbout that depth…With Earl Watford and John Wetzel now starting at right guard and left tackle, respectively, the Cardinals’ depth along the offensive line looks a little thin. Or, if not thin, inexperienced.The key reserves would appear to be rookies Cole Toner (guard), Evan Boehm (center) and swing lineman Taylor Boggs. All have earned solid reviews and offer potential. None are anywhere near proven.Boggs has appeared in seven NFL games, all with the Chicago Bears. Boehm has appeared in all eight games for the Cardinals this season, with minimal snaps on the line. Toner has yet to appear in an NFL game.Offensive coordinator Harold Goodwin, who works with the offensive line, shared some thoughts on the next men up along the line.“Kind of another swing guy, can’t play tackle but both guards and the center,” he said of Boggs. “Smart. Boggs had a pretty good chance probably to make the team until he got hurt. I don’t think he even played in a preaseason game. But smart guy, physical. Kind of another mini-A.Q. (Shipley).”As for Toner and Boehm, either one could be in line for the first significant action of their careers any point over the next eight games. Given the Cardinals’ record and the schedule that remains, they cannot really afford the defense to slip at all in the second half of the season. However, Peterson does not see it as a situation where the defense has to carry the team.“It takes all three phases to win ballgames,” he said. “Obviously if one phase is not playing up to its capability, obviously we have to pick up the slack. But we’re not looking to put the team on our back because we still have guys over on the offensive side that are capable of putting up points.“Carson (Palmer) coming off one of his best seasons yet, not having the season that the would hope for as of right now, but we still have the utmost confidence that those guys can get the job done.”Injury updateThe official injury report can be found here, and because Thursday was coordinators day, there was not much information given regarding players’ health.One nugget, however, came from Bettcher when talking about his team’s options in the slot as safety Tyrann Mathieu is dealing with a shoulder injury.“I think the guys that are going to be in there, guys that are taking reps this week — Ty’s health continues to get better and better,” he said. “I don’t comment on the injury report and all that stuff, but however that ends up being when we come to play on Sunday we’ll have full confidence in, whether it’s Ty or one of the other guys playing nickel that they’ll be prepared to get the job done.” Top Stories “The only way we are going to get to where we really want to be, and that’s winning games each week, we’ve got to work on our consistency defensively. Sure, I think if you’re a stats guy you love it, but all we want to do is win games. That’s what’s most important to us.”A deeper dive into the stats reveals the Cardinals’ 21 sacks are tied for eighth in the league, while their nine interceptions rank tied for fourth and their 13 forced fumbles are tied for third. Their six fumble recoveries place them in a tie for ninth.So, when looking for reasons why the Cardinals are 3-4-1, it is perhaps a little unfair to point a finger at the defense. Still, the Cardinals have not shut anyone out, and there have been instances where they have struggled to slow opposing offenses.Over the bye week, Bettcher and the defense took some time to watch film and reflect on the season’s first half, looking for areas they can improve.“Some of that we’ll keep in the room that we talked about, and some of the other stuff it just comes down to being on the same page,” he said of what they discovered. “And as we’ve gotten better defensively through the course of the season — because you can see a progression, and I’m sure everybody that’s watched us play can see a progression — as we have communicated better, we have played better, and that’s something that must continue for us defensively.” Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Follow Adam Green on Twitter “Cole, if he has to be called upon, he’s got to rise to the occasion, expectations won’t change — I’ll still be screaming and cursing,” Goodwin said. “And then Boehm, he’s been getting a little spot duty on kickoff returns, so he should be comfortable.“And the fortunate part, some of those early games that we had a huge lead, Boehm was able to get some snaps. So I don’t think when the lights come on and they hit the grass, I don’t think they’ll be shocked. I just think the speed of the game is probably a little bit faster than it is in the preseason, and the competition will be a little bit better because they’re not going against twos and threes in the fourth quarter now.”A fifth-round pick out of Harvard, Toner expressed confidence that both he and Boehm, a fourth-round choice out of Missouri, would be ready to play if asked. He is confident he would “rise to the occasion if the lights are on and I play.”That said, he understands there were and are things to learn.“The whole league is full of freaks,” he said of what his biggest adjustment has been in year one. “There’s not as many freaks, I guess, in the Ivy League. Meaning the size and speed that everyone has is much more. Everybody has secondary moves. If you stop one move, they’re going to have another move to counter that. You’ve just got to always be ready for that.” Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactcenter_img Bettcher added effort has not been a problem this season, as there have not been many downs where he thought the team needed to play harder.“Because our guys play passionate and they play hard, and that’s the most important thing about playing defensive football in the National Football League, you’ve got to play passionate and you’ve got to play hard,” he said. “And you’ve got to play smart, and that’s communication.”Cornerback Patrick Peterson echoed that sentiment, noting the emphasis going forward in the season’s second half is on making sure they are on the same page at all times.“And two, just make sure we’re playing with that passion and energy for 60 minutes and having fun,” he said. “Because when we do that for 60 minutes, we’re a tough defense to score on. We’re a tough team to beat when all three phases are on the same page.“So for the most part, as a defense, we have to make sure that our communication is at an all-time high, we have to make sure that we are playing with that passion and energy that we played with in those games that we won. If we can carry that over to the second half of the season for 32 quarters, because that’s what we have left in the regular season, I think we’ll be OK.” TEMPE, Ariz. — Did you know the Arizona Cardinals have the top ranked defense in the NFL?It’s true.At least, in terms of yards allowed, the Cardinals are at the top of the list, giving up an average of just 297 per game. For good measure, they are also tied for fourth in the league in points allowed, surrendering just 17.5 per outing.Good enough?“I think our guys have played some exceptional football, defensively, at times,” defensive coordinator James Bettcher said Thursday. “And I think we’ve played some defensive snaps that aren’t good enough. The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Arizona Cardinals defensive back D.J. Swearinger (36) celebrates his defensive stop after Seattle Seahawks running back C.J. Prosise (22) falls short of a first down during the second half of a football game, Sunday, Oct. 23, 2016, in Glendale, Ariz. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri) Comments   Share   last_img read more

21 Jul

Balco Boldon Graham Greene stand by for the naming of names

first_img Twitter 0 1 Facebook Share on Twitter Share 22 Apr 2008 18:55 Share on Facebook Share on Facebook 0 1 Shares00 0 1 Share Twitter 22 Apr 2008 15:53 Facebook Facebook Facebook Share on Facebook pierrelemer Share Share Balco, Boldon, Graham, Greene … stand by for the naming of names Facebook 0 1 Share on Pinterest Share Share via Email Share on LinkedIn Share on Twitter Share on WhatsApp Guaren Shugster:While I have not read the cyclists book you have mentioned, I am aware of the consequences of doping techniques such as EPO. If you were to increase transparency about the drugs and further educate the athletes, this would leave the decision with the individual athelete. Make it, say, illegal before the age of 18. If you were to ask a potential athlete, “you could be a good 100m sprinter, but with ‘this’ you MIGHT win an Olympic gold and break the world record, but it may cause some longer term health consequences”. You might find a lot of people are willing to take the health risk, for the risk of glory. An educated athlete would also know that as you pointed out, the effects are different on different people and therefore it may not have any use at all.I find the fact that no one points out that athletes are already on a range of supplements, creatine, cortisone injections and other such things, which in some instances are very similar to some of the illegal drugs. The idea that athletes wake up, have a bowl of Weetabix and go for a run is no longer the case.Yes the side effects are undesirable. We are now educated to know that 25 years smoking gives you lung cancer, but does that stop people smoking? If an athlete is prepared to take it, knowing the potential consequences, then I think it is not a problem.I find it even more interesting to think – A man using nothing more than what he was born might one day run the 100m in under 9 seconds or run a 4 minute mile Facebook The drugs can only be purchased from appointed distributors, from within the sports organisations or such like. The profits can be used to check athletes, control substance abuse and create a body that tests and identifies underage athletes, preventing problems. While not fool proof by any means (show me a system that is), for me it is a way of developing sports, if atheletes are willing. In the same way in more recent times, special kit, diet and other factors have led to developments in sports. My main point is still this. All the drugs or other methods of ‘cheating’ merely serve to enhance the bodies potential. Therefore, in my opinion, this cannot be used as a fair argument for not allowing drugs. It then comes down to the moral question of allowing people to knowingly consume a substance (etc.) that will have longer lasting effects on their health. This is a decision an athlete should take, surely, and not something a ‘body’ should decide on their behalf. 22 Apr 2008 16:29 oldest 22 Apr 2008 10:41 “Make it, say, illegal before the age of 18.”Here’s where the problem starts again though. If we cannot police it effectively at the moment anyway, how could we do so for under-18’s? Especially considering that if it were legal then more money would be going into the drugs, and less into detection methods. 25 Share on Facebook newest All Guaren | Pick Guaren, for me the problem is the knock-on effects of legalising the drugs. It will rapidly reach the point (if it’s not already there…) where one will have to be on drugs to win at various events. This means that the pressure to take these drugs will start earlier and earlier and we’ll eventually end up with a systematic doping regime in schools across the world. Though I’m sure this already happens to some extent, to have it legitimised is a little beyond the pail for most people.Add to that the fact that sprinters AREN’T actually aware of what the drugs do to their body. For a start there is no way of knowing what the long-term effects are as they are new drugs. You then have to rely on the drug producer to be completely honest with the athlete if they are asked any questions.Legalising drugs would create more serious problems than it would solve in my view. Reply | Pick | Pick Share on Twitter Reply Share on Facebook Share on Facebook 0 1 Share on Facebook Share Share on Twitter Twitter 0 1 Share Sportblog Facebook Report Twitter Share on Facebook Twitter It is worth remembering that after Mexico ’68 the world 100m record was stuck at 9.95 for 15 years. Then suddenly it started to shoot downwards. Very suspicious. But not as suspicious as Flo-Jo and the East European 400m women of the 1980s.How can you believe in great performances these days. I hope Carl Lewis didn’t cheat. But if the finger ever points at Michael Johnson, we might as well pack up and go home. Wow, I think a couple of guys posting on here have taken Cram’s words a bit too literally. I don’t think he was suggesting that taking drugs to break a record was a good thing, but hey, why stop at the chance of accusing someone of double standards. Share on Twitter Twitter joseph1832 | Pick “the quest to become the world’s fastest man or woman seems to need more than talent and good coaching in many cases”.Isn’t this exactly the point of view that, when expressed by Dwain Chambers, turned the athletics establishment against him; so that – having served his ban and already made one come-back – he is now quite unfairly being prevented from pursuing his sport with the support and recognition to which he is entitled?Will Mr Cram now be prevented from participating in Olympics-related events (such as carrying a torch for the Chinese regime, sorry games)? Twitter Share on Twitter Facebook 22 Apr 2008 20:06 Share The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian’s sport coverage Share on Twitter The drugs can only be purchased from appointed distributors, from within the sports organisations or such like. The profits can be used to check athletes, control substance abuse and create a body that tests and identifies underage athletes, preventing problems. While not fool proof by any means (show me a system that is), for me it is a way of developing sports, if atheletes are willing. In the same way in more recent times, special kit, diet and other factors have led to developments in sports. My main point is still this. All the drugs or other methods of ‘cheating’ merely serve to enhance the bodies potential. Therefore, in my opinion, this cannot be used as a fair argument for not allowing drugs. It then comes down to the moral question of – consuming a substance (etc.) that you know may cause longer lasting harm to your body. This is a decision an athlete should take, surely, and not something a ‘body’ should decide on their behalf. Reply | Pick BallaBoy DJKM Mon 21 Apr 2008 21.01 EDT 0 1 Percinho Share on Twitter Steve Cram Sportblog Reply Reply Is Calvin Smith going to get his world record back then?He’s the last champion that I have 100% confidence in.Should be a laugh this one, but not really many surprises I’m sure. Can’t wait myself. Order by oldest 22 Apr 2008 17:37 Twitter Report 0 1 Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share via Email Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Share on Twitter Topics | Pick Facebook pierrelemer collapsed 22 Apr 2008 16:06 nocod Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Facebook Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other Share on Facebook Reply Reply Share on Facebook 22 Apr 2008 21:27 | Pick Share on Twitter comment Steve: are you off to China to learn more about duplicity? Report Share on Facebook Report Twitter Share 100 0 1 Facebook Share on Twitter I know the advances in drug (masking) technology seems to easily outstrip the abilities of authorities to catch the cheating bastards, but what about this. Put all endeavours into finding a generic ‘drug finding’ solution (this may itself be a drug) – and give it to all athletes prior to the race. The effect of this penicillin type drug is to make any athlete who had has taken an illegal drug to shit their pants (used for both male and female here) whilst they run. Can you imagine David Colemans commentary? “Arrrrrrrrr, and it’s Chris.. ..Lew………. .Arrrrrrr…….OH!!! And Gree….Maurice Green has just shit in his pants….remarkable !!!!! There you go. All athletics woes solved with one simple solution. (Note: I have patented the idea for don’t think you can nick it – see more details at www.watchemshitforgold.com) Reply Share The original Olympics died through professionalism, professional athletics in Britain in the 19C died through gambling abuse and now sport is dying through the advances in pharamaceutical technology. The Balco business has confirmed what we all suspected when the she-men of East Germany and the Eastern Bloc set incredible records and the FloJo tendency broke new ground in the ‘clean’ 84 Olympics where rumour has it that urine samples were simply poured down the sin. If people found out that Seb, Steve, Crammy and Michael Johnson weren’t clean, I think that the sport would nosedive in the West even faster leaving it completely to the Third World ahletes who can still make useful money out of it. PaddyBl Reuse this content,View all comments > Twitter … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Facebook | Pick Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Facebook Report Reply shugster Threads collapsed Report | Pick Twitter Report Share on Facebook 22 Apr 2008 23:16 Report Share Twitter leytondanio | Pick Share on Facebook Report Show 25 Twitter Share on Facebook Share | Pick Reply 0 1 Read more Share MillieJ Share on Facebook Reply Share on Twitter Twitter Report BallaBoy Talk of legalisation is madness. Have we not already seen what suspicion about drug use has done to crowds, tv audiences, sponsorship etc etc?It’s been massively damaging to the sport, ensuring that (particularly in the sprints) new records and top championship performances are automatically greeted with suspicion. Whatever the moral or philosophical issues around drug use, Athletics will not be economically viable as a sport in which people are openly doping. And it will find it harder and harder to attract young kids who may not have the inclination or the resource to get involved in a pharmaceutical arms race from their teenage years, notwithstanding the reluctance of their parents to allow them to pursue a sport that they will inevitably see as tarnished. The appeal of athletics to the casual observer (and therefore its economic viability as a sport) lies in the sense of occassional awe that we get when we see someone run faster, run further, jump higher or longer or throw a distance greater than we could ever hope to. As soon as that achievement is ascribed to drugs more than talent, we cease to be impressed. Now we that train and play sport know that to run sub 10 you have to be pretty talented before you take anything performance enhancing, but that’s not the public perception. And it is public perception, or more accurately public apathy, that is killing athletics. I remember saturday evenings in the summer watching Coe, Cram, Elliot and Ovett racing grand prixs. Who would put anything but a major championship on prime time saturday night TV now? Wait for the Chinese swimmers and weightlifters coming from nowhere to win this summer. You won’t know what to believe. Deja Vu 1978-1988 all over again. 0 1 shugster, excellent example. On a personal note that book also illustrates part of BallaBoy’s point regarding the effects of drugs one the way we view a sport and athletes.The image on Pantani on that Alpe d’huez climb is stuck in my mind ,along with many other times when he burst away up a mountain. Of course there was always suspicion and talk at various times of drug use, but to have it so categorically laid out has meant that I now cannot look at a picture of him without mixed feelings. This same process is happening all the time in athletics and it will lead to more and more people becoming disillusioned with the sport. 0 1 Share The GB and NI 4×400 relay team in Tokyo that did the Americans, with Kris Akabusi going through on the back straight. Kelly Holmes in AthensI know they are different eras, but I’ve never had the whole family cheering for one team with quite the same fervour. Athletics can be so exciting because it is a fundamentally simple sport to understand, and whilst there is technique, its not the same as others, where tecnhique is more important than other factorsPlease cant we make bans so intollerable that no one with dope? Comments 23 0 1 Report 22 Apr 2008 12:08 22 Apr 2008 17:59 22 Apr 2008 15:16 23 Apr 2008 15:32 Share on Facebook Facebook recommendations Share Share Share on Messenger Last weekend, in anticipation of an unfavourable result at St James’ Park, I took the tried and tested ostrich method of arranging to be out of range of TV or radio so as not to have to witness Michael Owen’s continued revival against my beloved red and whites. Instead I was cycling across the country from Whitehaven on the west coast, arriving in a desolate Sunderland about one hour after the final whistle. Even the seagulls looked liked parrots.That may seem a little drastic but avoiding impending bad news is something most of us can identify with. Next month I’m off to walk part of the Great Wall of China and pay a pre-Olympic visit to Beijing and in doing so hope to similarly avoid the latest storm which is gathering over athletics. The latest episode of the ongoing Balco saga will see Marion Jones’s former coach Trevor Graham back in court and one of the prosecution witnesses giving evidence against him is Angel Guillermo Heredia.Reports in the US have suggested that both Heredia and Graham will be naming names. The former Olympic champion Maurice Greene has already been mentioned as one of those likely to be involved which in itself, if found to be true, would leave the world of sprinting in complete and utter disarray. The publication which we all use as the statistical bible has always had separate sections in the all-time lists for disallowed marks for things such as wind assistance, altitude or suspect distances and even hand timing. Now it also has a separate list of those marks eradicated because of doping suspensions.In the 100m it’s a reminder of how the event has almost single-handedly ripped the sport apart. Justin Gatlin 9.77, Tim Montgomery 9.78, Ben Johnson 9.79 and of course Dwain Chambers 9.87, to mention just a few. Add in Marion Jones and others in the women’s event and it only helps underline the fact that the quest to become the world’s fastest man or woman seems to need more than talent and good coaching in many cases. Now the long arm of the law can reach beyond any negative drug tests and point the finger at culprits from the past where the evidence is available. It is going to get ugly. Already accusations and counter-accusations have begun to fly. As the Observer reported at the weekend, Greene’s former friend and training partner Ato Boldon has reportedly written to their former coach John Smith expressing disgust at his alleged actions and distancing himself from the group he was part of for so long.But what and who can you believe? Athletes have always been quick to accuse rivals of duplicity when failing to realise that in bedrooms along the corridor their own names were being spoken of in similar terms. Any performance slipping into the top-10 all-time list has always been met with admiration and suspicion. In 1997 I was flying back to Tyneside after the Stockholm grand prix meeting in July. The star had been Boldon who had a stunning double victory in the 100m and 200m with only about an hour between races, considered to be the quickest double in one evening, 9.95 for the 100 and 19.82 for the 200m with Greene hot on his heels. Share on Facebook Twitter Share on Twitter comments (23)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Twitter Gloaming Share on Twitter Report | Pick 22 Apr 2008 16:30 Facebook Reply Twitter Share on Facebook Facebook Facebook Share Reply Joseph1832 – Agree completely. Broke my heart that Lewis wasn’t clean after all his protestations. Finished me with athletics, to be honest, and what I have now is nostalgia rather than enthusiasm – Coe, Cram, Ovett, Aoita,Kipketer, Daley Thompson, El Guerrouj,Ottey, Gebreselassie,Ed Moses, Devers, Kiptanoui,Peter Elliot, some great 4×400 races and out above and beyond them all Johnson. If he wasn’t clean, I genuinely don’t want to know. But, without sounding too high flown, I don’t think I’ll ever feel about any athelete the way I did about some of those from the early 80’s through to the mid-90’s. Drugs in sport Report Reply Share on Twitter | Pick Reply Report 23 Apr 2008 10:58 0 1 Report 0 1 0 1 Share Reply Guaren 22 Apr 2008 19:43 Share on Facebook | Pick Twitter 0 1 Reason (optional) and fun loving amy, not in the slightest taking drugs, is up for three song writing awards, a skill not at all enhanced by mood, mind and voice altering chemicals. i want to know whether steve cram listens to miss winehouse without a trace (none detected) of irony. TimeForBed Drugs in sport Report Facebook Report Reply Share on Twitter Reply Loading comments… Trouble loading? Report 0 1 Maurice Greene was named by Angel Guillermo Heredia in connection with performance-enhancing substances. Photograph by Anja Niedringhaus/AP. 0 1 Facebook | Pick Reply Twitter DJKM: “the quest to become the world’s fastest man or woman seems to need more than talent and good coaching in many cases”. “Isn’t this exactly the point of view that, when expressed by Dwain Chambers, turned the athletics establishment against him”Your post beat me to it – more double standards from Mr Cram. Report The sooner they legalise these drugs the better. You are never going to stamp it out and I don’t see what the problem is if everybody is aware of the possible harmful consequences to your health. After all a drug or doping technique does nothing more than maximise the potential of the human body. That in my opinion not cheating. It is purely because someone has decided this ‘drug’ is illegal, whereas this ‘supplement’ is not. | Pick BrazilBranch Gloaming 22 Apr 2008 19:03 Share on Facebook Reply Reply expanded Twitter 0 1 Facebook | Pick Report Reply Report | Pick Facebook Report | Pick Facebook Share on Twitter 22 Apr 2008 14:22 Percinho unthreaded Twitter Guerin:you should have a read at Matt Rendell’s book on the death of Marco Pantani. Many argue for legalising drugs in sport as if it simply improves the athletes equally relative to each other; they would still achieve the same results but would be a little quicker. Rendell showed this isn’t the case with drugs like EPO. Athletes do not respond the same way. Some will get a much bigger improvement in their performance than others. Therefore, you really would be reducing sport to whoever had the best pharmacy. And I’m not interested in watching sport like that.Perchino:Again Rendell’s book highlights your point. Pantani was almost certainly taking EPO as a teenaged amateur cyclist. In later years he was so dependent on the stuff his body wasn’t actually producing red blood cells at all without EPO. I agree, we do not want this happening generally across sport because the risks are too great. Percinho Report Twitter Share on Twitter 23 Apr 2008 18:21 Share Share on Facebook Since you’re here… 0 1 Guaren Share on Twitter greythirdman Support The Guardian 23 Apr 2008 18:19 “Wow, I think a couple of guys posting on here have taken Cram’s words a bit too literally. I don’t think he was suggesting that taking drugs to break a record was a good thing, but hey, why stop at the chance of accusing someone of double standards.”I am not aware that Chambers suggested it was a “good thing”. He was lambasted because he said that a dirty athlete would beat a clean athlete unless the dirty athlete “has to be having a real bad day. That’s what I believe”.Cram has said pretty much the same thing here “the fact that the quest to become the world’s fastest man or woman seems to need more than talent and good coaching in many cases”. Share on Twitter Twitter 22 Apr 2008 22:32 Share on Facebook Reply | Pick 0 1 Share 23 Apr 2008 1:20 First published on Mon 21 Apr 2008 21.01 EDT TimeForBed April 22, 2008 12:03 PM Telford/gbr Wait for the Chinese swimmers and weightlifters coming from nowhere to win this summer. You won’t know what to believe. Most if it. Mind you, I’d rather not believe we allowed track suited Chinese “security” personnel to accompany the Olympic torch through our streets, nor did we allow peaceful protest. The biggest problem the Olympics will have is credibility, at whatever level, sporting, political or ethical, you wish to focus upon. That night Carl Lewis ran an anchor relay leg as part of his farewell tour. He pulled me aside in the airport and without naming names he accused current athletes of diminishing the achievements of the likes of myself and Seb Coe and most importantly himself. He was prepared to go public, he had evidence he said. I reminded him that many had pointed the finger at his own performances which he dismissed out of hand.His anger must have subsided and in due time his own name did surface some years later in an alleged cover-up by the US Olympic Committee. The name-calling now looks likely to reach new heights, this time under oath. It is to be welcomed but it will certainly not be enjoyable. To continue the ornithological analogy I began with, the vultures will be hovering over athletics next month and I’ll be happy I’m not around to watch their easy pickings. 22 Apr 2008 20:36 | Pick Share Share Report 0 1 Share on Twitter | Pick Athletics Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp Close report comment form | Pick Share Email (optional) Share on Twitter 50 View more commentslast_img read more