12 Oct

Minister El Ouafa meets with Chinese delegation

first_imgRabat – Minister in charge of Governance and General Affairs, Mohamed El Ouafa held Wednesday in Rabat, talks with a delegation from the Chinese Ministry of Supervision on mechanisms of good governance and the fight against corruption in Morocco.In a statement to the press after the meeting, Mr. El Ouafa said he presented before the delegation the various institutional and legislative measures and mechanisms put in place by the government to foster the principles and values of good governance, and fight corruption.At the institutional level, El Ouafa said he discussed the powers of the various bodies and institutions responsible for ensuring compliance with the rules of fair competition and good governance, including the Competition Council whose powers were reinforced by the new constitution of the Kingdom. At the legislative front, he said he provided an overview on the new law on public procurement which aims to ensure proper use of public funds. For his part, the head of the Chinese delegation, Geng Wenqing, said the visit is part of strengthening relations between Morocco and China, noting that it aims to learn from the experience of Morocco in the field of good governance and the fight against corruption.last_img read more

12 Oct

Guinean President Alpha Conde Elected New AU Chairperson

Casablanca – The African Union has elected Alpha Conde as the new chairperson of the pan-African organization, succeeding Chadian President Idris Deby. The Guinean president, Alpha Conde, who has a good relationship with Morocco, has been announced as the African Union chairperson.Conde will succeed the Chadian President, Idris Deby, as the head of the union. Conde met the Moroccan Monarch, King Mohammed VI, on Sunday, during a royal dinner King Mohammed VI hosted in the presence of African Leaders. A meeting between the Moroccan Monarch and the newly elected chairperson of the AU purportedly went on longer than meetings with other heads of states.The election of Conde, by the Assembly of Heads of State, was expected as the position rotates among the five regions of the continent; North, Central, East, West and Southern African regions. This year it was the turn of West Africa.This election is being seen as a favorable sign for Morocco, as the kingdom has an exemplary diplomatic relationship with the entire region of West Africa.Conde’s was elected during the 28 summit of the African Union which began on Monday. In his acceptance speech, Conde said state members should work together to succeed in the integration of African peoples, adding that he “voluntarily and humbly welcomes the presidency of the union in 2017.”Conde added that his unanimous election represents an honor for him and for his country.The position is held for a one-year term, giving the chairperson the capacity to represent the continent at several international ceremonies and forums such as Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD), The Forum on China–Africa Cooperation (FOCAC), and the Group of 8 G8 and G20 summits. read more

12 Oct

Nigerian National Arrested at Casablanca Airport for Drug Trafficking

Rabat – Police services at the Mohammed V International Airport in Casablanca arrested, Sunday night, a Nigerian national for his alleged involvement in cocaine trafficking, the national police (DGSN) said.The 32-year-old suspect, who had abandoned a luggage at a reception area of a hotel located in the international transit station of the airport, was arrested at the boarding area, the DGSN pointed out in a statement.After searching the luggage, the police discovered 53 capsules containing 1.2 kg of cocaine, the same source added. The airport scanner also detected extra capsules hidden in the suspect’s stomach, which required his transfer to the Ibn Rochd hospital in Casablanca, the statement noted.The accused, coming from Sao-Paulo (Brazil) and heading for Freetown (Sierra Leone), was remanded in custody under medical supervision to remove the pills, before conducting a judiciary investigation under the supervision of the competent public prosecutor. read more

11 Oct

Limited funding could thwart progress in global efforts against AIDS – Ban

“In our global war on AIDS, the international community is on the verge of snatching defeat from the jaws of victory,” Mr. Ban wrote in an op-ed published in the Austin American-Statesman yesterday.He said funding was drying up and some donors were threatening to cap their support as a result of the global economic recession, a development that could leave millions of those living with AIDS to their fate. Other donors have been shifting their support to other diseases they feel are cheaper to treat and control.“At a time when we should be scaling up to meet the AIDS challenge, in other words, we are scaling back,” the Secretary-General wrote.He recounted a moving experience he had during a recent trip to Uganda when he met a group of young people who are living healthy lives despite being infected with HIV/AIDS because they are beneficiaries of a treatment programme that has received generous funding from the United States and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.“We are beautiful people; Laugh and dance in harmony,” the group, ranging in age from eight to 28, sang as they danced to an African drum rhythm.External support has enabled Uganda to scale up the number of HIV-infected people receiving anti-retroviral treatment from 10,000 a decade ago to 200,000 now.Across Africa, an estimated seven million people who should be receiving treatment for HIV/AIDS are not. Worldwide, the figure is 10 million, Mr. Ban wrote.He said the doctor who runs the Ugandan treatment clinic he visited, Peter Mugyenyi, told him that lack of resources had forced him to begin to make the difficult decision of putting people in need of treatment on the waiting list.“How do you choose, after, all, to treat a young girl but not her little brother? How do you turn away a pregnant mother, sitting with her children, crying for help?” the Secretary-General wrote.“At the International AIDS Conference in Vienna, in July, I hope the international community will rally around UNAIDS’ [UN Joint Programme on HIV/AIDS] launch of Treatment 2.0 — the next generation of HIV treatment, which must be more affordable, more effective and accessible to all. As chairman of this year’s replenishment of the Global Fund, I urge all donors to see to it that countries such as Uganda get the support they need, so that Dr. Mugyenyi need not make those difficult choices.“Yes, times are hard. That is all the more reason to act out of compassion and with generosity,” he added.Michel Sidibé, the Executive Director of the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS, wrote in an op-ed published yesterday in The New Vision (Uganda), that the football World Cup currently taking place in South Africa provides a good opportunity to talk about HIV for two reasons. “First, a celebrated sporting event such as the World Cup can encourage the spread of HIV through the combination of alcohol and unsafe sex,” he stated.“Second, almost 80 babies are born with HIV during the 90 minutes it takes to play a football match. This translates into 430,000 babies infected each year. Because we have the means to stop this tragedy, we must act today.”Football stars and UNAIDS Goodwill Ambassadors Emmanuel Adebayor of Togo and Michael Ballack of Germany have joined forces with the agency to launch a global campaign to prevent babies from becoming infected with HIV.The campaign aims to mobilize the football community to “give AIDS the red card” and eliminate mother-to-child HIV transmission between now and 2014, when the next World Cup is played in Brazil.“As the football fever spreads across the globe, let’s do everything we can to stop the spread of HIV. We have no excuse,” said Mr. Sidibé. 15 June 2010The international community risks losing the global battle against HIV/AIDS unless funding for projects to stem the spread of the disease and keep those infected healthy, especially in Africa, is sustained and increased, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has warned. read more

7 Oct

Small business slows as trade wars continue economists say

NEW YORK — The latest economic numbers point to a further slowing of business at many small companies, and economists say trade wars are a significant reason for the decline.On Wednesday, payroll company ADP reported that its small business customers had added just 11,000 new jobs during July at its small business customers, those with up to 49 employees. The smallest companies, those with under 20 employees, cut 18,000 jobs. The slender gain followed the loss of a combined 45,000 jobs during May and June. It was also far below a gain of 66,000 in April and the 52,000 jobs small companies added on average each month in 2018.The latest report showed that 5,000 jobs were lost in the manufacturing sector, ADP said.Meanwhile, the Institute for Supply Management, a trade group for corporate purchasing executives, said manufacturing activity grew at a slower rate during July for the fourth straight month. The ISM includes executives from companies of all sizes.The trade wars that began with the Trump administration’s tariffs on China early in 2018 and continued with retaliatory duties on U.S. goods are taking a toll on domestic manufacturers, economists say. Companies that import raw materials are paying 25% more on a wide range of products, and those who sell their products overseas are being hit by retaliatory tariffs. U.S. companies including retailers could take a further hit now that Trump is planning to tax $300 billion in Chinese imports, primarily consumer goods, in September.The trade wars and a slower global economy “are fast at work already doing real damage of the foundation of this economic expansion,” said Scott Anderson, chief economist with Bank of the West, after the Labor Department released its July employment report Friday. Although employers added 164,000 jobs last month, Anderson said growth in non-farm payrolls fell in the past three months, averaging 1.1% a month, down from a high of 1.9% in January.Small business employment is also down because companies are finding it hard to fill their open positions. They face a tight labour market and the fact that they can’t compete with higher salaries and benefits that big corporations offer.Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, said that the “job market is throttling back” because of the shortage of available workers and trade tensions. He said President Donald Trump’s tariffs appear to have caused a decline in manufacturing._____Follow Joyce Rosenberg at www.twitter.com/JoyceMRosenberg . Her work can be found here: https://apnews.comJoyce M. Rosenberg, The Associated Press read more

6 Oct

Conference at UN seeks nearly 500 million to rebuild Liberia

Morning session [2hrs 56mins]- Afternoon session [21mins] A donors’ conference seeking almost $500 million for the next two years to help Liberia rebuild from its devastating 14-year-long civil war opened today at United Nations Headquarters in New York with speakers calling for generous pledges to help the nation – and the West African region – get on the track to stability and recovery.The meeting was a “critical milestone” in the country’s journey from crisis to recovery, offering a chance “to help achieve a real and lasting peace dividend” for Liberians, Mark Malloch Brown, chair of the UN Development Group (UNDG), which organized the two-day International Conference on the Reconstruction of Liberia, said in his opening address.He recalled the signing in August of the peace accord that brought an end to 14 years of conflict and led to the international effort to help Liberians recover from the ruinous effects of war. The conference, he added, was a “crucial opportunity to help stabilize [the West Africa] region that has inevitably been affected by spill-over.” “But it is a fragile peace and urgent action is now needed to help ensure that the gains that have been made towards Liberia’s recovery are not reversed,” said Mr. Malloch Brown, who is also Administrator of the UN Development Programme (UNDP).Christian Herbert, Liberia’s Minister of Planning and Economic Affairs, said domestic resources were woefully inadequate to meet the needs of post-conflict reconstruction. External assistance is required to ensure improved security; the success of the disarmament, demobilization, reintegration and resettlement programme; good governance; democratic development and the rule of law; and respect for human rights and international humanitarian law.Mr. Herbert said the priorities contained in the rebuilding plan reflected the basic needs of the Liberian people. While the situation in the capital, Monrovia, and its environs could be considered to have improved, most of the country’s rural areas were inaccessible, and international support was critical to distributing humanitarian assistance there.On the humanitarian front, Carolyn McAskie, the UN Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator, noted that while great strides had been made since last summer, many Liberians had still not seen the benefits of the peace agreement. Urgent assistance was needed now so that people could return to their homes knowing that basic services were available. Stressing that many Liberians still live under conditions of war, she said there should be no false sense that everything was normal. Humanitarian action, she added, was essential to consolidate peace.A team comprising representatives from the UN, World Bank, International Monetary Fund (IMF), non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and the Liberian transitional government has been working for the past two months to prepare a report for the Conference assessing the country’s needs.According to that report, an estimated $488 million in assistance will be required for priorities ranging from demobilizing combatants – some as young as 12 – and helping them return home, get schooling and find jobs, to organizing elections in 2005, rebuilding roads, restoring electricity, reopening schools and health clinics, and stopping the spread of HIV/AIDS. That figure is in addition to about $180 million requested for Liberia in November by the UN as part of its consolidated appeal for all of its humanitarian activities worldwide.Today’s session was devoted to technical discussions, while the second day will hear contribution pledges. Participants on the second day will include UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, Secretary of State Colin Powell of the United States, Foreign Minister Dominique de Villepin of France, Chairman Gyude Bryant of the National Transitional Government of Liberia, and the Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Liberia, Jacques Paul Klein.Video of conference: – read more

6 Oct

Reproductive health vital for reducing poverty UN population agency says

The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) says that its publication, Reducing Poverty and Achieving the Millennium Development Goals: Arguments for Investing in Reproductive Health & Rights, demonstrates the future dividends of investing in reproductive health.These dividends would be reflected in healthier, more productive individuals and families, which would contribute to stronger, wealthier nations, it says. Among the many benefits of reproductive health, the report says, are improving family and community well being, boosting economic gains, saving women’s and children’s lives, and greatly curbing the spread of HIV/AIDS. Poor reproductive health, says the report, accounts for a sizeable proportion of the world’s total burden of disease and disability – as high as one third among all women, and one fifth of the total global burden, including men and women.The report also presents a list of ways reproductive health can be improved. The list was included in the “Stockholm Call to Action,” which was endorsed by a number of ministers, parliamentarians and leaders of multilateral agencies, civil society and youth organizations earlier this year. The list includes the empowerment of women to participate fully in development, the building of more equitable health systems, the linking of the HIV/AIDS efforts with reproductive health, and support for young people’s health and development. read more

2 Oct

Worsening food insecurity forcing more people to migrate finds new UN report

In its new report, At the Root of Exodus: Food security, conflict and international migration, the UN World Food Programme (WFP) found that each one per cent increase in food insecurity pushed 1.9 per cent more people towards migration. However, the act of migration itself can cause food insecurity, given the costs, lack of opportunities and often hazardous conditions along the journey, and force people to continue to move.“With millions of our brothers and sisters having fled their homes and facing so much hardship, it is our duty to shed light on their tragic situation,” David Beasley, the Executive Director of WFP, said in a news release announcing the report. “By understanding the dynamics that compel people to move, we can better address what lies at the heart of forced migration and what must be done to end their suffering,” he added. The report is launched at a moment when multiple protracted crises and a period of political transition challenge the levels of international food and humanitarian assistance provided for refugees and people who have been forcibly displaced. Link between food insecurity and armed conflictThe WFP study is the first time such comprehensive analysis has been carried out on the subject. It is based on quantitative and qualitative research and features often dramatic accounts of people forced to take extreme measures when left with nothing at all. A country with rising levels of food insecurity and conflict will experience greater outward migrationWFP reportOne particularly troubling finding was the link between food insecurity and armed conflict: food insecurity was found to be a significant cause for the incidence – and intensity – of armed conflict, with 0.4 percent more people fleeing a country for each additional year of conflict. “This means that a country with rising levels of food insecurity and conflict will experience greater outward migration, or movement of people away from their homes,” noted the UN agency. People want to stay closer to their homesThe report also found that people who are displaced often do not want to move far away from their homes, and try to stay as close to their place of origin as possible. Nearly eight in ten Syrian refugee families interviewed had been internally displaced inside Syria at least once, and 65 per cent twice or more. Almost every single Syrian participant in the study strongly affirmed a desire to return to Syria if the situation stabilized and security prevailed. In light of these findings, one of the key recommendations contained in the report is for increasing investments in food security and livelihoods at or near people’s place of origin. “Doing so may prevent further displacement, reduce forced onward migration, result in more cost-effective humanitarian interventions and yield greater socioeconomic benefits now and in the long term,” noted WFP. read more

28 Sep

Football Brendon White stepped up when Ohio State needed him most

The Buckeyes have been susceptible to big plays through the deep ball, and, coming in against Nebraska, they were without sophomore cornerback Jeffrey Okudah with a groin injury and sophomore safety Isaiah Pryor to an impingement of the shoulder.Then, in the second quarter, junior safety Jordan Fuller was ejected for a targeting penalty, leaving a depleted secondary with major question marks on who would step up.This gave sophomore safety Brendon White the opportunity to be the guy. White proved he could be that and more in Ohio State’s 36-31 victory over the Cornhuskers.“Dream come true actually. After the game, I started tearing up,” White said. “I just couldn’t believe, you know, growing up from Ohio … went to Olentangy Liberty 15 minutes from here and, always went to the games as a high school kid and then, being able to play at your dream school, it’s pretty cool.”White finished the game with 13 tackles and two for a loss in the game, both of which were team highs. The sophomore had six tackles in his collegiate career before Saturday’s game.“Brendon White came in and did a hell of a job,” head coach Urban Meyer said. “He’s been working very hard in practice to earn the trust of the coaches to get on the field.”White made big plays all night for Ohio State, including on the biggest stop of the night. With Nebraska down 30-21 in the fourth quarter, the ball was at the Buckeyes’ four-yard line. Senior running back Devine Ozigbo carried the ball up the middle on third down, and was stopped by White at the one, forcing Nebraska to kick a field goal, missing an opportunity that ended up costing the Cornhuskers in the long run.“My time is ready, you know, we all prepare for this. You never know what’s gonna happen in any game,” White said. “You gotta face adversity and we faced it in the right way, in a positive manner and no one got worried and we just did our job and the rest took care of itself.”White said the success has come from hard work at practice, where he gained confidence and stayed ready for his opportunity to make a difference.Meyer echoed that belief, and that started away from the defensive end.“He’s been working very hard in practice to earn the trust of the coaches to get on the field,” Meyer said. “First thing, you gotta earn the trust to get on the special teams. And to see that he started and I kept hearing about it, earning the trust — he’s getting better, he’s getting better, he’s getting better, and then he obviously proved it today.”White was a big factor in helping Ohio State survive a potential upset against Nebraska, and he may have earned himself a right to start alongside Fuller in the future.But to go along with a career game from the sophomore, White’s dad, William, who played safety at Ohio State for four years, had a tribute video on the screen at Ohio Stadium for his battle with ALS.White said that only added to a game he most certainly won’t forget.“I definitely saw that, definitely didn’t want to tear up but I got emotional about it, and it was pretty cool to see that,” White said. “My dad is one of my idols, so, you know hopefully I made him proud today, and hopefully it can go up from here.” read more

22 Sep

DECISION ON MAY 26 Junior Fasano or Conversano to become Italian handball

Conversano handballhandballItalian handballJunior Fasanopalamano Junior Fasano or Conversano to become Italian handball champions? The series of the Play Off Final is on the way, Junior Fasano leveled score on 1:1 after convincing home victory – 26:18 (13:10) on Sunday.Junior Fasano – Conversano 26-18 (p.t. 13-10)Junior Fasano: Fovio, Cedro, Angiolini 2, Costanzo, D’Antino 3, De Santis L. 1, De Santis P, Leal, Maione, Messina 4, Radovcic 4, Riccobelli 11, Rubino, Venturi 1.Conversano: Lupo M, Monciardini, Beharevic, Carso, Dedovic 2, Giannoccaro 1, Iballi 1, Lupo J. 1, Pignatelli, Pivetta, Sciorsci, Sperti 9, Stabellini 4, Vicenti. The third decisive match will be played on Fasano’s court on May 26. Junior Fasano won title in 2016, while Conversano are waiting since 2011. ← Previous Story PGE Vive Kielce and Orlen Wisla Plock for title in Poland Next Story → Wacker Thun new Swiss champions in dramatic finish! read more

22 Sep

I could tell there was carnage going on Being voted out of

first_imgIN TERMS OF local government, you can’t get more a high-profile position than Lord Mayor.No matter how many press releases a rank-and-file councillor sends out — in terms of generating media attention, it’s impossible to compete with the draw of those chains of office.From school fetes to the visits of foreign dignitaries, the country’s mayors are rarely out of the pages of their local papers.But whatever their benefits, those ceremonial chains hold no special powers — a fact borne out last weekend as Dublin, Cork, Galway and Clare all lost their mayors in the local elections.All four were from Government parties, reflecting the fate meted out to Labour and Fine Gael councillors all over the country — as voters voiced their anger at the Coalition’s recent sub-par performance.So what’s it like to go from first citizen to… well, just plain ‘citizen’ in the space of a single election count?The Mayor“To be honest, I hadn’t expected to lose my seat,” says Dublin Lord Mayor Oisín Quinn (yes, he’s still mayor for the moment).Then again, there’s always the danger that people are just being polite on the doorsteps.Long-serving councillor Mary Freehill was the only one of three Labour candidates to win a seat in the Rathgar/Rathmines ward of Dublin City Council in last Friday’s election.Quinn says that in spite of a series of dire opinion poll showings for Labour in the run up to the vote “there was probably a perception that I was probably going to hold on to it”.Those Southside voters are an unfailingly pleasant bunch, of course.The Labour Councillor says that while locals often said they were happy with his own performance in the Mansion House, there was “always a danger” the votes wouldn’t go his way.As Lord Mayor of Dublin there’s an extremely busy schedule of things… You’re out every day as part of the role, and I’ve been very busy working on various initiatives.Quinn says that while his schedule meant he didn’t canvass as much as he could have, the news that he hadn’t retained his seat still came as an unpleasant surprise.The CallThe phonecall from the RDS count centre came through after midday on Saturday, Quinn says.I was told the tally result. By 12.30 I knew I lost the seat.Listening to the coverage on the radio, Quinn says it had become more than apparent by Saturday afternoon that the party was suffering a similar fate in councils all over the country.I could tell there was carnage going on… It was looking like a bad day, there had been a big swing against us.He’d had an inkling a poor result might be on the cards in the city the previous day, however — as he called in to polling stations to see how turnout was going.Turnout was very low. But as I talked to presiding officers they started telling me that it was mostly older people who had been turning out.Given the Government’s introduction of new levies like the property tax and water charges, it seemed likely the grey vote was likely to go against the coalition.With younger people, though, there’s often a sense that the uplift in the economy might benefit them and they’ll have some wiggle room.The CountOnce the news of his defeat began sank in, there was still a visit to the count centre to endure.Says Quinn, “people would expect it of you as Lord Mayor. The media would have questions to ask.”Come the following day, it was back the daily mayoral schedule of glad-handing and photo-ops, at the annual Phoenix Park Africa Day celebrations.“After ten years in office in local government, I’m happy Labour was able to show up and make decisions,” Quinn says — as he faces into his final week in office.A new Lord Mayor will be voted in, once his year-long term concludes on 6 June.Read: “Low-grade mini-Funderland” not what St. Patrick’s Day should be about — Lord MayorRead: Phil Hogan ‘should hold plebiscite anyway’ — Lord Mayorlast_img read more

17 Sep

Remembering 911 Remembering Conrad Howell

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, September 9, 2016 – This weekend, we also remember the tragedy of 9-11, 15 years later and our own September 11th tragedy in the mysterious death of pastor, preacher, broadcast show host, husband, father, brother and so much more, but notably the author of the country’s National Song – This land of Ours – Rev. Dr. Conrad Howell.  It was one year ago on September 11 that Howell went missing; a cadaver dog aided in the search where scores of residents turned out to find missing Howell.  Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:remembering 9/11, remembering Rev. Conrad Howellcenter_img Rev was found on Saturday September 12, his body was in bushes not too far away from his home in the Blue Mountain area.  While Police ruled the death not a homicide, residents rejected the notion of a suicide.last_img read more

6 Sep

Training held on Safe MGR Train Operations in Ramagundam

first_imgRamagundam: Two-day training programme on ‘Safe MGR Train Operations’ was conducted at NTPC-Ramagundam on Tuesday, 2019 wherein officials dealing with MGR Train Operations, maintenance, retired railway loco pilots, station masters, points man and others have attended in large numbers besides concerned officials from NTPC-Kudgi and Solapur.The training programme will continue on Wednesday also. Also Read – Call to sensitize SC, ST laws in Hanamkonda Advertise With Us Conducted as a new initiative, the programme aims at achieving zero Incidents with the thrust on continual analyzing, reviewing and adopting best practices in the specialized field of railway siding. During this occasion, faculty AK Keshari, ex-GM of NTPC spoke on various aspects of MGR Train Operations with the thrust on safety. Earlier, Bishnu Charan Polai, GM (Operation) inaugurated the event wherein Soumendra Das, GM (Maintenance & FM) and other senior officials were present.last_img read more

5 Sep

World Bank India sign 250 million loan pact for Rebuild Kerala programme

first_imgKerala floodsMANJUNATH KIRAN/AFP/Getty Images)The central government, the Kerala government and the World Bank have signed a loan agreement of $250 million (Rs 1,725 crore) for the First Resilient Kerala Programme to help Kerala get back into shape after the 2018 floods.The 2018 floods and landslides in Kerala had led to severe impact on property, infrastructure, and lives and livelihoods of people. One-sixth of the state’s population – about 5.4 million people – were affected while 1.4 million were displaced from their homes, especially the poor and vulnerable segments of the population.The Resilient Kerala Programme will focus on strengthening Kerala’s institutional and financial capacity to protect the assets and livelihoods of poor and vulnerable groups through an inclusive and participatory approach.Union Finance Ministry official Sameer Kumar Khare said that the programme is part of the government’s support to Kerala’s ‘Rebuild Kerala Development Programme’ aimed at building a green and resilient Kerala. He said that this partnership will identify key areas of policy and institutional strengthening to maximise development impact.The loan agreement was signed by Sameer Kumar Khare on behalf of the government and Junaid Kamal Ahmad, Country Director, World Bank India.The World Bank has been working closely with the central government and Kerala government since the floods struck in August 2018 in assessing the impact of the floods and assisting in recovery and reconstruction. The bank support also helped identify policies, institutions and systems for resilience to disaster risks and climate change.Junaid Kamal Ahmad said that the partnership is a key pillar of the bank’s new Country Partnership Framework for India. Through such partnerships, the bank will support select states striving to bring about systemic improvements in the way development initiatives are planned and executed.”In Kerala, we will work across cross-cutting themes and priority sectors to build systems of resilience. We are committed to supporting the state government in bringing about a perceptible change in the lives and livelihoods of its citizens,” he added.last_img read more

31 Aug

Sex worker attacked health condition critical

first_imgKolkata: A sex worker of Sonagachhi was injured after being attacked by a youth.The incident had taken place on Imam Box lane on Thursday. The 28-year-old woman was immediately rushed to a nearby hospital. Police said the victim was in her room when the accused went inside her room on Thursday night. The accused later stabbed her with a sharp weapon and fled the spot. After being informed police reached the spot and started a probe. The victim’s husband rushed her to the hospital. Her health condition is stated to be serious. According to police, a surgery was performed on the patient at RG Kar Medical College and Hospital. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeIt was learnt that some locals heard the victim screaming in pain. They rushed to her room and found her lying in a pool of blood. The victim’s husband, who was around, rushed to the spot following the incident and took her to the hospital. The investigating officers are waiting for the woman to recover following which she would be interrogated. Cops are yet to ascertain the exact motive behind the attack. Some locals mentioned that there are allegations against the victim. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThey told police there had been instances where the woman had snatched money from her clients. None has, however, lodged any police complaint against the woman. A detailed probe has been initiated to ascertain the exact cause of the attack. The accused has been at large since the incident took place. Police also came to know that the accused had visited the victim on earlier occasions as well. They are trying to know the whereabouts of the accused. Raids are being to nab the culprit.last_img read more

30 Aug

IBM Looking at Adopting Bitcoin Technology for Major Currencies

first_img 4 min read This story originally appeared on Reuters International Business Machines Corp is considering adopting the underlying technology behind bitcoin, known as the “blockchain,” to create a digital cash and payment system for major currencies, according to a person familiar with the matter.The objective is to allow people to transfer cash or make payments instantaneously using this technology without a bank or clearing party involved, saving on transaction costs, the person said. The transactions would be in an open ledger of a specific country’s currency such as the dollar or euro, said the source, who declined to be identified because of a lack of authorization to discuss the project in public.The blockchain – a ledger, or list, of all of a digital currency’s transactions – is viewed as bitcoin’s main technological innovation, allowing users to make payments anonymously, instantly, and without government regulation.Rather than stored on a separate server and controlled by an individual, company, or bank, the ledger is open and accessible to all participants in the bitcoin network.The proposed digital currency system would work in a similar way.”When somebody wants to transact in the system, instead of you trying to acquire a bitcoin, you simply say, here are some U.S. dollars,” the source said. “It’s sort of a bitcoin but without the bitcoin.”IBM is one of a number of tech companies looking to expand the use of the blockchain technology beyond bitcoin, the digital currency launched six years ago that has spurred a following among investors and tech enthusiasts.The company has been in informal discussions about a blockchain-tied cash system with a number of central banks, including the U.S. Federal Reserve, the source said. If central banks approve the concept, IBM will build the secure and scalable infrastructure for the project.IBM media relations office did not respond to Reuters emails about this story and the Fed declined to comment.However, there are signs that central banks are already thinking about the innovations that could arise through digital currency systems. The Bank of England, in a report in September 2014, described the blockchain’s open ledger as a “significant innovation” that could transform the financial system more generally.Instead of having ledgers maintained by banks that act as a record of an individual’s transactions, this kind of open ledger would be viewable by everyone using the system, and would use an agreed-upon process for entering transactions into the system.The project is still in the early stages and constantly evolving, the source said. It is also unclear how concerns about money-laundering and criminal activities that have hamstrung bitcoin.Unlike bitcoin, where the network is decentralized and there is no overseer, the proposed digital currency system would be controlled by central banks, the source said.”These coins will be part of the money supply,” the source said. “It’s the same money, just not a dollar bill with a serial number on it, but a token that sits on this blockchain.”According to the plans, the digital currency could be linked to a person’s bank account, possibly using a wallet software that would integrate that account with the proposed digital currency ledger.”We are at a tipping point right now. It’s making a lot more sense for some type of digital cash in the system, that not only saves our government money, but also is a lot more convenient and secure for individuals to use,” the source said.(Reporting by Gertrude Chavez-Dreyfuss; Editing by David Gaffen and Tomasz Janowski) March 13, 2015 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Register Now » Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more

27 Aug

Assessing Cardiotoxicity Response With CardioOncology Ultrasound Imaging

first_img Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Women’s Health View all 62 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Technology Reports View all 9 items Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Information Technology View all 220 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Videos | Cardio-oncology | June 30, 2016 Assessing Cardiotoxicity Response With Cardio-Oncology Ultrasound Imaging Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Find more SCCT news and videos Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.center_img SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. ASE 2016 – Cardio-oncologyVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:17Loaded: 1.24%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:17 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Interview with Federico Asch, M.D., FACC, FASE, associate director of the echocardiography core lab at Medstar Health Research Institute and assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) at Georgetown University, at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) 2016 annual meeting.  Asch discusses the technology used for cardio-oncology cardiotoxcity assessments and how to set up these types of collaborative programs between oncology and cardiology.  For more information, read the article Assessing Cardiotoxicity Due to Cancer Therapy. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Recent Videos View all 606 items Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. 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Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

18 Aug

Congo Rwanda agree to mount force against rebels

first_img Get a lawn your neighbor will be jealous of Associated PressKINSHASA, Congo (AP) – The leaders of Congo and Rwanda have agreed in principle to back a neutral international armed force to combat Congo’s newest rebellion and other fighters terrorizing civilians in the country’s mineral-rich east, and the African Union said it could help by sending soldiers.Congo state television said leaders of the two countries met Sunday in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia _ their first meeting since accusations backed by a U.N. report charge Rwanda helped create and arm the new M23 rebels. Rwanda denies the allegations. Jean Ping, the African Union’s outgoing chief bureaucrat, said Sunday that the pan-African organization would be willing to send troops for such an international army fighting in eastern Congo.Congo already has the world’s largest peacekeeping force of nearly 20,000 U.N. soldiers and police. Their primary mandate is to protect civilians, but they also have orders to support Congo’s army in its fight against rebels and militias. In that support role, the U.N. troops often have retreated when Congolese soldiers flee.In New York, U.N. spokesman Martin Nesirky said the world body was still looking into the details agreed upon at the AU summit and the Great Lakes region meeting, adding that Congo’s peacekeeping mission “stands ready to support regional efforts to resolve the crisis in eastern DRC within its mandate and capabilities.”The U.N. Security Council late Monday welcomed the Kagame-Kabila discussions to resolve the crisis and encouraged “continued high-level dialogue at the bilateral and regional level.” It urged the governments of Congo and Rwanda to fully implement bilateral and regional “mechanisms” to address insecurity in the east. New high school in Mesa lets students pick career paths Sponsored Stories Patients with chronic pain give advice More Valley freeways to be closed this weekend for improvements Meghan McCain to release audiobook on conservatism, family Joseph Kabila of Congo and Paul Kagame of Rwanda had met for 1 1/2 hours and then endorsed an agreement hammered out at a meeting Thursday of foreign ministers of the 11-nation International Conference of the Great Lakes Region attended also by the defense ministers of Congo and Rwanda.Among several clauses the agreement calls for a regional body, the Great Lakes conference, to work with the African Union and the United Nations “for an immediate establishment of a neutral international force to eradicate M23, FDLR and all other negative forces in eastern DRC (Congo), and patrol and secure the border zones.”The FDLR or Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda is led by Hutus who helped perpetrate Rwanda’s 1994 genocide and escaped to Congo. Some 800,000 Tutsi people and moderate Hutus were slaughtered in Rwanda. Two years later, a Rwandan-backed rebellion erupted in eastern Congo. Back-to-back civil wars drew in the armies of a half dozen nations in what degenerated into a scramble for Congo’s rich mineral resources.Peace was eventually negotiated in 2002, but a low-level conflict simmers unabated in eastern Congo. The Rwandan genocide perpetrators regrouped to attack Congolese Tutsis and allied tribes. The Congolese formed militias to defend themselves against the invaders. Today, eastern Congo is a battleground for numerous groups including rebels from Rwanda, Uganda and Burundi and more than a dozen homegrown militias vying for power and control of the mineral resources. The council strongly condemned the M23 attacks, demanded an immediate halt to all violence in eastern Congo and urged that the commanders of M23 including Bosco Ntaganda, who is wanted for alleged war crimes by the International Criminal Court, be apprehended and brought to justice.The council reiterated its condemnation of all outside support to armed groups in Congo and demanded that such backing “cease immediately.” It also called on all countries in the region “to cooperate actively with the Congolese authorities in demobilizing the M23.”Kabila’s army _ ill-equipped, ill-paid and demoralized _ is accused of pillaging and rape of civilians as often as are the rebels and militias, putting U.N. peacekeepers in an invidious position. Congo’s soldiers have proved no match for the rebels, who are said to number in the hundreds compared to the army’s 150,000.Ongoing fighting has forced more than 200,000 civilians from their homes, including more than 20,000 across borders into Rwanda and Uganda.U.N. peacekeepers have deployed helicopter gunships to bombard rebel positions in the past week. The rebels allege that civilians were killed in the air raids, but provided no death toll. In a letter to the U.N. Security Council, the rebels then threatened to view the peacekeepers as partisan, hostile forces unless the U.N. explains their “real mandate.”Three years ago, Kabila had called for the withdrawal of the U.N. mission, accusing it of failing to protect civilians and to help bring peace to eastern Congo. A few hundred U.N. troops were sent home, Kabila stopped his criticism, and neither side has said anything about a withdrawal recently.___Edith Lederer in New York contributed to this report.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Think Tank analyzes the second round of Democratic debates Comments   Share   Top Stories The vital role family plays in societylast_img read more