4 Sep

CITY MOVES | WHO’S SWITCHING JOBS

first_img whatsapp Show Comments ▼ CITY MOVES | WHO’S SWITCHING JOBS Thursday 24 March 2011 8:48 pm LOVEFiLMNick James has been appointed as new digital technical development director at the online film rental company. James will work alongside Lesley Mackenzie, group digital officer, on the technical co-ordination of new device platforms, building technology partnerships and further developing back office technical infrastructure.He joins LOVEFiLM from twocashew, a media consultancy responsible for the design and deployment of video on demand products.JefferiesAlix Bernard has joined the global securities and investment banking group as managing director for European credit sales in Paris. She joins the firm from Liquid Capital Securities, where she was head of European credit sales. Previously, Bernard spent five years at Dresdner Kleinwort as head of credit sales for France and Benelux.LV= Asset Management The fund management arm of the mutual insurance, investment and retirement group, has appointed Ian Harvey as head of institutional business development. This is a newly created position for LVAM as it looks to build a presence in the institutional market.His most recent role was head of pooled funds and defined contribution at BNY Mellon Asset Management International where he had overall responsibility for the $9bn pooled fund business working with UK pension funds, charities and family offices.Arbuthnot SecuritiesThe investment banking arm of Arbuthnot Banking Group, has recently appointed James McIntyre as a director in closed-end fund sales and Peter Brown, who joins the market making desk, covering closed-end funds.McIntyre was previously on the board of SAFEX and was also head of derivatives at RAD Bank. Brown has spent 17 years at JP Morgan (previously Chase Manhattan and Robert Fleming).Jones Lang LaSalleThe commercial estate agent has appointed two new EMEA research directors from April. Robert Stassen will be the new head of EMEA capital markets research while Andrew Burrell becomes head of EMEA forecasting. Stassen joins from Credit Suisse, where he was he was a senior equity analyst covering European property stocks and Burrell was previously chief economist at consultancy King Sturge. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastMoneyPailShe Was Famous, Now She Works In {State}MoneyPailSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBePeople TodayNewborn’s Strange Behavior Troubles Mom, 40 Years Later She Finds The Reason Behind ItPeople TodayDrivepedia20 Of The Most Underrated Vintage CarsDrivepediaZen HeraldThe Truth About Why ’40s Actor John Wayne Didn’t Serve In WWII Has Come To LightZen HeraldElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite Herald Read This NextRicky Schroder Calls Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl ‘Ignorant Punk’ forThe WrapCNN’s Brian Stelter Draws Criticism for Asking Jen Psaki: ‘What Does theThe WrapDid Donald Trump Wear His Pants Backwards? Kriss Kross Memes Have AlreadyThe WrapPink Floyd’s Roger Waters Denies Zuckerberg’s Request to Use Song in Ad:The WrapHarvey Weinstein to Be Extradited to California to Face Sexual AssaultThe Wrap2 HFPA Members Resign Citing a Culture of ‘Corruption and Verbal Abuse’The Wrap’The View’: Meghan McCain Calls VP Kamala Harris a ‘Moron’ for BorderThe Wrap’Black Widow’ First Reactions: ‘This Is Like the MCU’s Bond Movie’The Wrap’Small Axe’: Behind the Music Everyone Grooved On in Steve McQueen’sThe Wrapcenter_img whatsapp Tags: NULL Share KCS-content last_img read more

23 Jun

Martin Scelzo

first_img Playing at tighthead prop is rarely, if ever, a case of rocking up to a big stage for the first time, packing down and blowing everyone away. More often, playing at No 3 means honing your craft and taking your beatings over time until you’re the most resourceful and resilient scrummager.It’s with that spirit of endeavour that Martin Scelzo rose to international renown. A Test player in 1996, any glamour in those early years of professionalism passed him by as he continued to graft at the famous, amateur Hindu club.It wasn’t until after the 1999 World Cup that the tighthead was lured from his homeland, playing a part in Northampton’s only Heineken Cup victory in 2000. He was continuing to learn.Scelzo had a number of team-mates to contend with during his time. Omar Hasan, Mauricio Reggiardo and later Juan Figallo all vied with Scelzo to be a starter. But the Pumas tighthead is not an easy role. So much onus is placed on the scrummage, and so much passion flows through the pack, that the exhaustion can go bone-deep. Scelzo kept picking himself up. By the time the 2007 World Cup rolled around, Scelzo was 31 and had learned things the hard way. Domestically he had played a major role in changing the identity of his club Clermont – to this day coach Vern Cotter calls him “a legend” for the work he did. Internationally, he was one third of a terrifying front three, alongside Rodrigo Roncero and Mario Ledesma. Major teams: Northampton, Narbonne, Clermont, AgenCountry: Argentina Test span: 1996-2011Argentina caps: 59 (33 starts)Test points: 50 (10T) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Sometimes people find their place and time in the world. For Scelzo it was that 2007 World Cup in France. He was magnificent in the set-piece and unforgiving in the loose.After dominating for a few more years he would play in a fourth World Cup, but would never reach the same standard. For a brief window he was a true world master. TAGS: The Greatest Players last_img read more

20 Jun

Ecumenical panel kicks off UN forum on indigenous issues

first_img Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ecumenical panel kicks off UN forum on indigenous issues Sarah Eagle Heart (right), the Episcopal Church’s missioner for indigenous ministries, reads a prayer following “Churches Disavow the Doctrine of Discovery: Calling for Poverty Alleviation and Healing” panel on the first day of the 11th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. ENS photo/Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service] In the 1850s, native people living in the western United States signed “peace” treaties with the U.S. Government in exchange for land; land that was to provide a safe homeland and economic opportunities, explained Cheryle Kennedy, chairwoman of the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde of western Oregon, during an ecumenical panel discussion May 7 at the United Nations Church Center.A century later, in 1954, in an “act of termination,” when the government took the land back and stripped the native people of their indigenous status, “many bad things happened, but we were not broken,” she continued.In the 1970s, the confederated tribes resolved to overturn the government’s decision and by 1983 their indigenous status had been restored; in 1986, 10,000 acres had been returned. Since then, Kennedy said, they’ve been buying back land “acre by acre.”The Episcopal Church and other faith groups were among the sponsors of the U.N. panel session, titled “Churches Disavow the Doctrine of Discovery: Calling for Poverty Alleviation and Healing,” which sought to address education, land rights, reconciliation, healing and practical next steps. It was attended by nearly two dozen people.The panel discussion took place on the first day of the 11th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII), meeting May 7 – 18 and themed “The Doctrine of Discovery: Its enduring impact on indigenous peoples and the right to redress for past conquests (articles 28 and 37 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples).The “Doctrine of Discovery” refers to international laws that were understood to set forth the ways in which colonial powers laid claim to newly discovered territories beginning in the early 1500s and continuing through the 1700s. (Throughout the 19th century, it was believed that the United States, specifically people of Anglo-Saxon descent, were destined to expand across the continent, in what was referred to as “Manifest Destiny.”)The 2009 meeting of the General Convention of the Episcopal Church passed a resolution (2009-D035) repudiating the Doctrine of Discovery. The Anglican Church of Canada took a similar action in 2010, followed by the World Council of Churches in 2012.In addition to Kennedy, the panel included Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori; Robert J. Miller, a professor at Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, Ore.; and Sarah Augustine, director of the Suriname Indigenous Health Fund and a member of the Mennonite Church.Sarah Eagle Heart, the Episcopal Church’s missioner for indigenous ministries, moderated the panel, which began with the screening of a video produced by the Episcopal Church that explores the lasting impact of the Doctrine of Discovery.The hurt left by the doctrine on North America’s native people can be seen in the form of high suicide rates, alcohol and drug abuse, and the prevalence of violence and rape. It’s not easy to enter into the work of reconciliation; and it’s easier for non-native people to walk away and ignore the acts of their ancestors, said Eagle Heart.“It’s much, much harder to sit together and face the pain,” she said. “Healing from excruciating pain is still needed today.”Following the eviction from the Garden of Eden, the Bible is full of stories that focus on human communities and their striving to return “to a homeland that will be a source of blessing for the whole community, said Jefferts Schori during the panel.“Through the long centuries, the prophetic understanding of that community has broadened to include all the nations of the earth. Even so, the seemingly eternal struggle between dominators and stewards continues to the present day.“Most of the passages in the Bible that talk about land are yearning for a fertile place, where people are able to grow crops, and tend flocks, and live together in peace. The offspring of those first human beings gave rise to people who hungered for land, and many of them did a great deal of violence through the ages in order to occupy and possess it. The Christian empires of Europe were consumed with battles over land for centuries, and eventually sent military expeditions across the Mediterranean in a quest to re-establish a Christian claim on what they called the Holy Land,” she continued.Miller, the law professor, talked briefly about international law and the Doctrine of Discovery, going back to the Crusades, when Rome and the Christian monarchies of Europe set out to dominate the world and subjugate and enslave all non-Christian people.In 1436, Pope Eugene IV issued a papal bull giving control and sovereignty of the Canary Islands to Portugal, rather than Spain, which then sent Portugal on the path to colonization down the western coast of Africa. Spain, feeling left out, headed west. In 1493, Pope Alexander VI issued four papal bulls that, in effect, divided the “new world” in half; splitting it between Spain and Portugal, said Miller.“When the Europeans showed up, native people lost title to their land,” he said.Other European nations followed, staking claim to territories by planting flags and crosses, but it wasn’t until 1823, with Johnson v. McIntosh, that the United States defined the Doctrine of Discovery, as “discovery” and “conquest,” limiting tribal land and sovereignty rights. The court case, which involved a land dispute between two white men in Indiana, became the international model, added Miller.Even today, said Augustine, indigenous people are being “colonized.” Augustine works with indigenous people in Suriname who have been displaced and made sick by the growth of the mining industry in that small South American country, which until 1975 belonged to the Netherlands.“The people I help need help every day,” said Augustine, urging those present to encourage aid to indigenous people through the support of grassroots movements. She also urged support for nations such as Suriname and the United States to adopt the U.N. rights of indigenous people into their constitutions.The May 7 panel was co-sponsored by the Episcopal Church, the Anglican Communion, the World Council of Churches, the Mennonite Central Committee, the World Federation of Methodist and Uniting Church Women, The Grail (an international women’s movement), the Gray Panthers, U.F.E.R. – International Movement for Fraternal Union among Races and Peoples, Suriname Indigenous Health Fund, the NGO Committee on the U.N. International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, the Salvation Army, the World Christian Student Federation, and Office of the Chaplain of the Church Center for the United Nations.— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Indigenous Ministries Comments are closed. Ecumenical & Interreligious, Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC May 13, 2012 at 8:55 pm So glad to see this report here. Would like to see reports of the other activities that week as well. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Comments (1) Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Margaret Harris says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA By Lynette WilsonPosted May 7, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

20 Jun

Council conversations, action focus on communion life

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Anglican Consultative Council spends much of its time in Auckland gathering in small groups for conversation. Here Episcopal Church member Josephine Hicks, left, the Rev. Maria Christina Borges Alvarez of Cuba, Scottish Primus David Chillingworth and Church of Pakistan Bishop Humphrey Peters (back to camera) listen as the Rev. Canon Dickson Chilongani, of the Anglican Church in Tanzania, far left, speaks. ENS photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service — Auckland, New Zealand] The Anglican Consultative Council during its session here Nov. 6 (local time) continued to consider how the life of the communion might be enhanced and deepened.Their discussions focused on the Anglican Covenant, the four instruments of communion (which include the ACC) and the Continuing Indaba project.The council hit a minor bump on the way to approving a resolution on the Continuing Indaba project during which some members raised the issue of whether that process can be expected to be used to help the communion solve difficult issues. The resolution encourages further development of project, which has during the past three years helped to enable conversation across different contexts, break down barriers and build communion friendships.The council is not anticipated to take any formal action on either the covenant or the future of any of the instruments of communion.Not all of the provinces have been able to consider the covenant since it was sent to them in December 2009 because of their governance cycles, the Rev. Canon Kenneth Kearon, Anglican Communion Secretary General, said during a press briefing.The communion’s Standing Committee will meet after this ACC gathering to assess where the covenant reception process stands, according to Kearon. There will come a time, he said, after all the provinces have had their say on the covenant when the Standing Committee will no doubt say that the covenant is “operational” for those provinces that have adopted it.Those provinces will have voluntarily agreed to an “intensification of relationships” that Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams has suggested the covenant would create, Kearon said.“That’s where the difference will be seen for those who have actually adopted the covenant; not whether you are in or out communion because of what you’ve decided, which I think is sometimes the question,” Kearon said. “That’s not going to happen.”During the hour council members spent hearing a summary of each other’s thoughts on the covenant and the instruments of communion, they learned that “in places where the covenant is contentious, people remain committed to the communion, to talk, to share, to relate to each other,” according to Helen Biggin, Church in Wales.“Some groups feel we simply don’t need a covenant,” she said. “There was strong affirmation for sections 1 to 3, but considerable caution for section 4 [which outlines a process for resolving disputes]. Some of the reasons for that included a reluctance to give one group authority over another; a concern that it would make Anglicanism confessional in a way it wasn’t before [and] the thought it might be punitive.”Biggin also noted that some provinces expressed “an anxiety about whether they would then become second-class members of the communion” if they did not adopt the covenant.The Anglican Covenant first was proposed in the 2004 Windsor Report as a way that the communion and its provinces might maintain unity despite differences, especially relating to biblical interpretation and human sexuality issues. The last ACC meeting, in Jamaica in May 2009, decided to delay release of the third and final draft of the covenant to the provinces for their consideration because the ACC members thought the covenant’s process for resolving disputes needed more work.After a small working group solicited input from the provinces about that process, the final version of the covenant was released to the provinces for formal consideration in December 2009. An updated account of the status of that consideration is here.The Nov. 6 session also heard a summary of themes that emerged during the council’s small-group reflections on the past, present and possible futures of the instruments of communion. The Rev. Sarah Macneil, Anglican Church of Australia, reported that members are “overall very positive about the membership in the communion.”However, “many ACC members feel that there is a need to clarify and refine the instruments and how they relate to each other,” she noted.Joanildo Burity, Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil, said the council members “strongly affirm the value of having lay and ordained meeting together” by way of the ACC, which is the only instrument that includes Anglicans who are not bishops or primates.“We feel like the ACC is being true to its own calling” and is “rais[ing] issues for the communion in a more pro-active way,” he said.The members would like to see more laity included in the ACC, he said. The membership includes from one to three persons from each of the Anglican Communion’s 38 provinces, depending on the numerical size of each province. Where there are three members, there is a bishop, a priest and a lay person. Where fewer members are appointed, preference is given to lay membership. However, Kearon said during the briefing that often clergy and bishops are chosen for those seats.Council members suggested allotting at least two seats to each province and requiring that one of those seats be filled by a lay person, Burity said. He also added that members discussed encouraging ACC members to meet regionally between ACC meetings and promoting ongoing participation of ACC members in the life of the communion in between meetings, perhaps by formally linking them to the work of its networks.Diocese of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island Bishop Sue Moxley summarized comments on the Lambeth Conference. The members think that the admittedly expensive gathering of the communion’s bishops promotes “building collegial and trusting relationships between the bishops” but that its decennial cycle makes it hard to maintain those connections. She said the gathering also helps to quash “the rumors we have all heard about each other.”ACC members suggested regional meetings of bishops between, and perhaps instead of the conference. They also wondered if bishops ought to meet with lay and clergy before the conference so their insights might increase the scope of the conference, she said.The Very Rev. Herman Browne, Church of the Province of West Africa, said members saw the Primates Meeting as “as a gathering of mutual affirmation and for the benefit of primates themselves” in their work leading provinces. ACC members also suggested that primates communicate the work of their meetings to their provinces. The members also suggested more time needs to be spent on gaining shared understanding how individual provinces empower their primate.The Rev. Canon Dickson Chilongani, Anglican Church of Tanzania, said the members see the archbishop of Canterbury as “a symbol of our unity” and the “spiritual and historical center of our communion.” However, he said, some wonder whether the archbishop must be English or whether the position could rotate throughout the communion.The Inter-Anglican Standing Commission on Unity, Faith and Order is monitoring the reception of the covenant and conducted an initial study of the instruments of communion at the request of ACC-14. The group meets again in November 2013. The Rev. Canon Alyson Barnett-Cowan, director of unity, faith and order at the Anglican Communion Office, encouraged ACC members to continue the conversation in their provinces and send her their feedback.The conversation about the communion’s common life continued with the council considering the first three years of the Continuing Indaba project authorized by ACC-14, and its future.A process of indaba, a Zulu word meaning purposeful discussion, formed the basis for groups of around 40 bishops that met each day during the Lambeth Conference in 2008. The program, which is partly a continuation of the Anglican Communion Listening Process, has enabled Anglicans to discuss and learn about experiences from contexts far removed from their own and to wrestle with differences concerning issues such as human sexuality and theological interpretation.The hope is that it will produce a body of resources to enable deeper relationships for the sake of mission around the Anglican Communion. During the first phase there were four pilot conversations between three dioceses, each from different provinces.There is more information about those conversations here.Southern Africa Archbishop Thabo Makgoba, a member of the Lambeth Design Group that introduced the wider communion to indaba, said the process is not “about transplanting elements from one culture into a completely foreign and inappropriate context.”“It is essential to focus on the Scriptures and gain insights from the diverse cultures of the communion,” he said.Suzanne Lawson, Anglican Church of Canada, participated in one of the pilot conversations and told the council that she learned “it takes time and honest effort, and much planning in advance to develop … relationships.”“We couldn’t talk about them, we had to talk about us,” she said. “I also learned to pull myself back from stereotypes.”Lawson said the council has been engaging in the same sort of process. “I have felt indaba-ish in the last few days and those are the riches I take home,” she said.Indaba can be used, Hong Kong Archbishop Paul Kwong said, “to meet an urgent need to hold our communion together in a time of tension and real or potential division” and seeks to energize global mission.It “encourages genuine conversation across the differences; it seeks to build trust and models a way of decision-making that is not confrontation or parliamentary” but instead calls for “mutual and intense listening to deeply held opinions” and a willingness to delve deeply into Anglicans’ shared faith.Scottish Episcopal Church Primus David Chillingworth said indaba could be used to strengthen unity.“You cannot be a family just by saying you are one, or that you want to be one,” he said. “You have to place yourself in situations in which the spirit can move you, be challenged and changed.”Indaba is not a program, he said, “it is a movement, it is a way of being the church.”However, some ACC members asked that the enabling resolution they were considering include language that would direct the process toward resolving the communion’s contentious issues.Archbishop Ikechi Nwachukwu Nwosu of the Province of Aba, Church in Nigeria, was among them. He later told Episcopal News Service that he agrees with everything about the indaba project, especially because indaba is used extensively in his country. However, he said, it is indeed usually used “in conflict moments.”“Everybody’s opinion is taken on board and everybody helps to make sure that the crisis or whatever the problem is, is solved,” he said, noting that the process can take a short time or years.Nwosu said the important thing is that if there is a crisis, the community does not want it to continue so they decide, “let’s all put our heads together and see how we can solve it.”“I just wanted a little bit of that direction to be added,” he said.The council debated adding language to the resolution supporting the future of the project saying that the process ought to be used “with a view to encouraging resolution of disputed issues.” Nwosu supported that addition.ACC Chair James Tengatenga, Diocese of Malawi bishop, told the meeting that Continuing Indaba is “not a panacea” and that the members are also confronting issues of“how do we as a communion solve our problems.”Endorsing the project will not mean that the ACC thinks indaba is a “magical solution to our problems,” he said.He then asked the council to vote on whether it wanted to vote on the version of the resolution with the added language, which would have also commended further exploration of the approach to the next Lambeth Conference. When the majority of the members voted against considering the amended resolution, Tengatenga put the original resolution to them. It passed with 45 yes votes, 12 no votes and nine abstentions.Church of England Bishop Stephen Cottrell (Diocese of Chelmsford) pointed out the irony that “we’re voting on a motion on indaba and we failed to use the indaba process.”Resolution 15.21 receives the report of the Continuing Indaba project, encourages provinces to “engage with the theological underpinnings” of the project and hear the stories of the pilot conversations and requests further development of Continuing Indaba including effective communication of the project, a widening of the theological base, developing models of facilitation and facilitator training, and a commitment for ongoing evaluation.ACC backgroundThe ACC is one of the four instruments of communion, the others being the archbishop of Canterbury (who serves as president of the ACC), the Lambeth Conference of Anglican bishops, and the Primates Meeting.Formed in 1969, the ACC includes clergy and lay people, as well as bishops, among its delegates. The membership includes from one to three persons from each of the Anglican Communion’s 38 provinces, depending on the numerical size of each province. Where there are three members, there is a bishop, a priest and a lay person. Where fewer members are appointed, preference is given to lay membership. The ACC’s constitution is here.The council meets every three years or four years and the Auckland meeting is the council’s 15th since it was created.The Episcopal Church is represented by Josephine Hicks of North Carolina; the Rev. Gay Jennings of Ohio; and Bishop Ian Douglas of Connecticut.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori is attending the meeting in her role as a member of the Anglican Communion Standing Committee, which met here prior to the start of the ACC meeting. Douglas is also a member of the Standing Committee.A complete list of the ACC15 participants is here.All ENS coverage of ACC15 is here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 6, 2012 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Anglican Communion, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Council conversations, action focus on communion life Covenant, instruments of communion, Continuing Indaba all get attention Rector Knoxville, TN Anglican Consultative Council Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

18 Jun

The infamous Hand of Back incident of 2002

first_imgTuesday Jan 27, 2009 The infamous Hand of Back incident of 2002 The 2002 Heineken Cup Final will be remembered as a match that ended in a heap of controversy as an incident took place that tarnished a players reputation with Munster supporters for possibly the rest of time.ADVERTISEMENTIt was Munster up against the Leicester Tigers in the show piece of Northern Hemisphere rugby, with Leicester leading 15-9 with time on the clock virtually up.Munster had one last chance of an attack, with a scrum deep in the opposition half. As Peter Stringer went to put the ball in, the referee was unsighted, which led to Leicester flanker Neil Back illegally slapping the ball back onto the safety of his side of the scrum.It caused the turnover, which resulted in the game coming to an end shortly afterwards, and Leicester winning the Heineken Cup.Leicester boss Dean Richards saw nothing wrong or illegal about what hed done, while captain Martin Johnson said that those type of things always happen, its just that this time, it was seen clearly on TV.“If it gives an advantage to your team, obviously you’re going to say ‘great,’ and if the opposition do it you won’t be happy, but these things happen – just not always in the last minute of a major final.”The Munster press and fans were livid though, labelling Back a cheat, to which he responded remorsefully shortly afterwards.ADVERTISEMENT“In a way, I wish I hadn’t done it,” said Back.“I have to be honest about it. I don’t like people thinking I’m a cheat. I don’t want that slur. I’m not a cheat. I had a lot of mail over that incident, mostly negative. There were letters saying I was a cheat, some of them from Leicester fans, which was a bit hurtful.If people wanted to make me feel bad about what happened, they have. That’s disappointing and I know it upset my wife, Alison. If I thought there was any possible way of redressing it, I would consider it. I regret it because I don’t like to think that, because of that one incident, there are people who think I’m a cheat.”“It has tarnished my reputation. In making any judgment, I would hope people will evaluate me over my whole career and not label me on that one moment. It happened spontaneously. I weighed the options up in a split-second and did what I did.”ADVERTISEMENTTime: 0:47Note:  Commentary from Austin Healey, who is seen kicking the ball out at the end.Thanks to the contributor who made the effort to get the clip up and submit the link.  Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Related Articles 81 WEEKS AGO scottish prop saves fire victim 84 WEEKS AGO New Rugby X tournament insane 112 WEEKS AGO Vunipola stands by his comments supporting… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueey10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

17 Jun

Quokka House / Martin Dulanto

first_imgShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/923621/quokka-house-martin-dulanto Clipboard Lead Architect: Martin Dulanto ArchDaily Houses Peru Save this picture!© Renzo Rebagliati+ 15Curated by Clara Ott Share Year:  CopyHouses•Lima, Peru ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/923621/quokka-house-martin-dulanto Clipboard Area:  159 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Projectscenter_img Architects: Martin Dulanto Area Area of this architecture project 2017 Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project “COPY” “COPY” Quokka House / Martin Dulanto Project Manager:Raúl MontesinosCollaborators:Gabriel Tanaka, Micaela Elliot, Daniela GomeroConstructor:Taller 33 Arquitectura y ConstrucciónStructures:Jorge AvendañoElectrical Installations:PlaneaSanitary Installations:PlaneaMechanical Installations:PlaneaCity:LimaCountry:PeruMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Renzo RebagliatiRecommended ProductsWoodAccoyaAccoya® Cladding, Siding & FacadesWoodLunawoodThermowood FacadesDoorsLonghiDoor – HeadlineWoodSculptformTimber Click-on BattensText description provided by the architects. This project is part of an exploration of the scale of privacy of interior and exterior spaces, where the protagonists, surrounded by a lattice screen, are two blocks and a void that is generated between them. Save this picture!© Renzo RebagliatiThese are two “boxes” or volumes located on different levels, linked to each other with the means of a void: an open-air interior courtyard. The first block is occupied by the social area and is characterized by its permeability. This is achieved through the extensive use of transparent tempered glass on both sides of the axis facing the sea; as well as, through the existence of an external social terrace that receives the visitors. The second block, withdrawn from the front of the building, houses the private area of the house on two levels: an elevated area and a basement, both facing the sea.Save this picture!© Renzo RebagliatiSave this picture!Floor 1The courtyard between these two blocks houses an interior terrace with a swimming pool and the stairs that allow access to the different floors, with a bridge leading to the upper terrace. The program has been divided into two zones: The private area which houses the bedrooms, the living room, the interior courtyard and the service area; and the social area that houses the dining room, the living room, the kitchen and three terraces, one inside and one outside on the first floor and another on the second floor. The house has been covered, on three sides with a white lattice that provides privacy and a homogeneous facade. This lattice confers the back facade and the side facades.Save this picture!© Renzo RebagliatiProject gallerySee allShow lessKengo Kuma on Career Choices, Cross-cultural Education and His Proudest Moment in Ar…ArticlesNo Footprint House / A-01Selected Projects Share Manufacturers: Aceros Arequipa, Decor Center, Furukawa, Hidronamic, Raúl Trujillo, Sol, Unicom. Quokka House / Martin DulantoSave this projectSaveQuokka House / Martin Dulanto CopyAbout this officeMartin DulantoOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesLimaPeruPublished on August 27, 2019Cite: “Quokka House / Martin Dulanto” [Casa quokka / Martin Dulanto] 27 Aug 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodSiding Façade SystemWindowsMitrexSolar WindowMetal PanelsAurubisPatinated Copper: Nordic Green/Blue/Turquoise/SpecialMetal PanelsDri-DesignMetal Panels – CopperIn architectureSikaBuilding Envelope SystemsExterior DeckingLunawoodThermowood DeckingMembranesEffisusFaçade Protection – Breather+Metal PanelsPure + FreeFormCustom Metal Cladding – Legacy Fund 1 BuildingWood Boards / HPL PanelsInvestwoodWood Fiber Partition Walls – ValchromatDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile FILO 10 Vertical Pivot Door | BrezzaSkylightsFAKROEnergy-efficient roof window FTT ThermoToilets / BidetsBritexToilets – Accessible Centurion PanMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

17 Jun

Canvas House for co-living / Ministry of Design

first_imgShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/935471/canvas-house-for-co-living-ministry-of-design Clipboard CopyAbout this officeMinistry of DesignOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsHospitality ArchitectureLodgingResidential ArchitectureHousingRefurbishmentRenovationColivingOn FacebookSingaporePublished on March 16, 2020Cite: “Canvas House for co-living / Ministry of Design” 16 Mar 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogBathroom AccessorieshansgroheBath & Shower ThermostatsGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ NaturalPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Mirage®WindowsVitrocsaSliding Window – Mosquito NetSinksBradley Corporation USASinks – Verge LVG-SeriesMetal PanelsTrimoQbiss One in Equinix Data CentreSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Q-ClassMetal PanelsLongboard®Aluminum Battens – Link & Lock – 4″Sports ApplicationsPunto DesignPunto Fit in Ekaterinburg Public SpaceWoodBlumer LehmannFree Form Structures for Wood ProjectsKnobsKarcher DesignDoor Knob K390 (50)TablesVitsœ621 Side TableMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?纯白外籍公寓‘庐宅’ / Ministry of Design是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream CopyLodging, Renovation, Coliving•Singapore “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/935471/canvas-house-for-co-living-ministry-of-design Clipboard Photographs Year:  “COPY” Photographs:  Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project 2020 Lodgingcenter_img ArchDaily Save this picture!© Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography+ 20Curated by Hana Abdel Share Interior Designers: Ministry of Design Area Area of this architecture project Projects Singapore Canvas House for co-living / Ministry of Design Canvas House for co-living / Ministry of DesignSave this projectSaveCanvas House for co-living / Ministry of Design Area:  350 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Manufacturers: Ikea, Chai’s Classic Home, Ecolinks, Emperor’s Attic, Golden Teak, Hock Siong, Journey East, Junky Corner, Kang, O2 Plants Island Landscape and Nursery, P+ Capital, Royal Interior, Second Charm, Soul & Tables, Umbrosa, Vintage PalaceArchitects:Ministry of DesignDesign Team:Colin Seah, Kornpetch Chotipatoomwan (Nong), Yupadee Suvisith (Fai), Justin Lu, Zhang HangDeveloper:FigmentPainting:Reimage (furniture, artifacts, art) Ong Nga Renovation (walls, stairs)General Contractor:Forte ResourcesElectrician:Logic EngineeringCountry:SingaporeMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Edward Hendricks, CI&A PhotographyText description provided by the architects. Historic dwellings like conservation shop-houses are repositories of memories, with previous lives and a past of their own. Ministry of Design explores history and our relationship with the past, present and future through the concept of layers in Canvas House at Blair Road. Blurring the boundaries between space and object, MOD conceptually blanketed Canvas House with a layer of white that provides a canvas for the future, whilst revealing historical preservation in concentrated spots. The house rhythmically reveals parts of its past, with Shadows of old timber as well as Layers of revealed brick and intricate details of re-purposed and upcycled furniture. At the same time, MOD invites visitors to imagine a future with Dream, a text-based neon piece that the studio created, with a quote by Thomas Jefferson that encapsulates MOD’s approach toCanvas House. The quote summarizes the attitude of the house; Colin explains, “it is a neutral white canvas for the future to be dreamt upon, rather than a wholesale homage to the past.”Save this picture!© Edward Hendricks, CI&A PhotographySave this picture!Floor plansSave this picture!© Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography1. The Brief and how MOD answered it – MOD has newly completed an all-white Canvas House for co-living, set in a heritage shophouse in Singapore along Blair Road. The developer (Figment) gave us a fixed budget and 4 months (design, sourcing & fitout) to re-imagine the interiors, with the aim of renting out the suites to expats for 3-12 month stays. Rentals start from S$3300 a month. The brief was to do something absolutely appealing to long-stay renters, and a way for this co-living shophouse to stand out. Faced with a tight budget and a tight timeline, alongside the desire for an overarching concept to underpin the moves, Colin and his team conceptualized the “Canvas House”: a. Painting the entire house in white, to provide a canvas for the future, MOD decided to focus on “upcycling” to meet both constraints. b. Majority of the tables, chairs, chests, mirrors, screens and vanity desks, were repurposed and given a new lease of life. c. To pay homage to the past, yet give it character for the future, MOD painted these pieces all white but carved out “playful peek-a-boo reveals” of vignettes on the decorative dragon or longevity vases, ceramic plates hung on the wall, and wooden screens, vanity dressers and chairs. Not only is this highly sustainable in terms of upcycling, it is also budget friendly, time-constraint friendly, and conceptually striking.Save this picture!© Edward Hendricks, CI&A PhotographySave this picture!© Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography2. “I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past” – Blurring the boundaries between space and object, MOD conceptually blanketed Canvas House with a layer of white that provides a canvas for the future, whilst revealing historical preservation in concentrated spots. P 02 Colin explains, “When it comes to adaptive reuse projects, the question is always the same, how do we tread the line between the past and the present? If one opts for the project to be just about preservation, it’s as good as time standing still… which could be paralyzing and inhibiting. But at the same time, neither do we want to disregard history completely by creating something too foreign or novel. Our response was to layer over the existing history with a proverbial blank canvas whilst leaving choreographed glimpses into the past, blanketing both space and the furniture in it – allowing us to blur the inherent boundaries between past and present, object and space.”Save this picture!© Edward Hendricks, CI&A PhotographyTo present this spatially, MOD created a text-based neon art piece, featuring a quote by Thomas Jefferson that encapsulates MOD’s approach to Canvas House. The quote summarizes the attitude of the house, quoting Colin, “it is a neutral white canvas for the future to be dreamt upon, rather than a wholesale homage to the past.” Fabricated by The Signmakers, the quote is penned in a single-stroke white and red glass neon, and encased in an aluminum box measuring 1.4m x 2.2m x 0.1m.Save this picture!© Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography3. Blurring the boundaries – In a sense, the white blurs the distinction between new and old; it also blurs the distinction between the spatial elements (e.g. walls, ceiling), and the objects that sit within it (e.g. the furniture and lights). With everything white, object/space dichotomy is blurred. The house becomes more whole rather than a space populated by objects and people that move in and out. That allows the people using the space, to truly activate the space, and be the prominent features instead of merely inhabiting space.Save this picture!© Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography4. Layers and Shadows – Parts of the past are rhythmically revealed throughout the space, with Layers of revealed brick and intricate details of pre-owned furniture, and Shadows of old timber. This technique is applied to a variety of places, including round timber reveals on the stairs throughout the four-storey house, and playful peek-a-boo reveals of vignettes on decorative dragon or longevity vases, vintage ceramic plates hung on the wall, and wooden screens, vanity dressers and chairs. Historic details are preserved in a similarly conceptual fashion, where brick walls are revealed in concentrated circles. In the suites in particular, visitors will see “time shadows” cast by the beds, which reveals the underlay of the floor. Working with our builder, we marked out the outline of the afternoon-sun shadow and had the painter paint around this outline, allowing the mark of time to cast its mark on the ground.Save this picture!© Edward Hendricks, CI&A Photography5. Collaborating with artist Kang to design custom lights MOD collaborated with Kang, an artist who specializes in upcycling and working with fused plastic to craft fashion accessories, to produce his first series of lights. Part of MOD’s incubation program, Kang works from the MOD office to craft his materials. MOD collaborated with Kang to create 3 sets of  luminaries with fused plastic made from cling film, placed at the five-foot-way, the living and the atrium areas. Keeping to the theme of layers, the cling film was layered and then ironed and heated to create a waterproof, leathery material.Save this picture!© Edward Hendricks, CI&A PhotographyProject gallerySee allShow lessMaison TL / Nghia-ArchitectSelected ProjectsOpen Call for Curator Lecture Series Auditorium 20/21Call for SubmissionsProject locationAddress:28 Blair Rd, SingaporeLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Sharelast_img read more

16 Jun

Remember A Charity cab offers free rides for words of wisdom

first_img Melanie May | 30 November 2016 | News Tagged with: legacy promotion Remember a Charity Remember A Charity cab offers free rides for words of wisdom  90 total views,  4 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis22 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis22center_img Remember A Charity is sending a black cab into the streets of London this week, offering free fares if the passenger instead pays with some personal words of wisdom as currency.The ‘wisdom-powered’ taxi carries the ‘Pass on something legendary’ message on its sides as well as the Remember A Charity logo, and is part of it’s ‘knowledge for knowledge’ project, which aims to build understanding amongst the public about the importance of what they pass on in life and of legacy giving. It sees taxi driver Grant Vickers exchange his usual ‘London Knowledge’ for swapping knowledge with his passengers that has been passed down across family generations.Vickers said:“Chatting with passengers is part of the nature of the job, and you often learn some strange things from those who travel with you, but this week has been really thought-provoking already about things that matter in life. People have really engaged with the whole leaving a gift for others idea.”Rob Cope, Remember A Charity director said: Advertisement “We wanted to remind people about the wonderful gift of giving. We hope our pay it forward taxi will encourage others to reflect what else they might pass on, including a gift to their favourite charities in their Will.”Earlier this year, Remember A Charity researched the UK’s most popular words of wisdom that people pass on in life, revealing a top three of: Make the most of every day; Age is only a number; and Happiness takes us places that money never will. Wisdom shared by people who have already taken part in the knowledge for knowledge project this week include; Everything works out well in the end, and if it hasn’t worked out yet then it’s not the end; Work hard now and it;’ll pay off later; and Enjoy every day, it might be your last.  89 total views,  3 views today About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

15 Jun

Washington’s panic over Snowden and the case of the Bolivian president’s plane

first_imgBolivian President Evo MoralesIt should have generated screaming headlines: “President of Bolivia’s plane forced to make emergency landing due to U.S. pressure.”Instead, the U.S. corporate media ran small articles telling how the plane carrying Bolivian President Evo Morales home from an energy conference in Moscow was refused overflight permission by France, Spain, Italy and Portugal on July 2 while in the air.  It couldn’t land to refuel before crossing the Atlantic Ocean. The plane finally had to touch down in Vienna, Austria, where it sat for 13 hours, until Morales allowed an Austrian “inspector” onboard.Why did this shocking, unprecedented assault on the sovereign nation of Bolivia happen? The forcing down of Morales’ plane is a violation of international law: Aircraft carrying government leaders have diplomatic immunity. So the countries involved gave only technical reasons for refusing to allow the plane to fly over their territory.While none in authority actually admitted it, everyone knew the real reason. The U.S. believed that someone very important to its “intelligence” agencies might be on board. He wasn’t, as it turned out. But the message had been sent to the world: “We want Snowden and we’ll do anything to get him.”Edward Snowden is the contract worker for the National Security Agency who sacrificed his career, and perhaps much more, by releasing to the world documents showing the vast extent of U.S. electronic spying on scores of countries — and people in the U.S. too. He is considered a hero by millions of people, including many, many in the U.S., for having gone up against his employers —  the vast repressive apparatus of the seemingly all-powerful government of the United States.Of course, most people already suspected the U.S. government had been using the hyper-modern technology at its command to mine all kinds of data: text messages, emails, phone calls, twitter feeds, etc. — and privacy be damned. That really wasn’t the point.The point was to show the literally millions of people who are involved in this kind of “secret” work that the government owns their souls and they’d better not follow their consciences instead of the contracts that bind them to secrecy.What this incident reveals, however, is that the imperialist government, which exists to further the interests of a small segment of society — much smaller really than the already hated 1% — is not all-powerful. It relies on being able to keep under its control a vast bureaucracy that, in periods of rapid social change and chaos, may have their own ideas about the justice and validity of what they are being forced to do.In other words, while many of these government employees (or people like Snowden who work for government contractors) may be very well paid by comparison to other jobs, they are workers. In the long run, their interests are in direct opposition to those of the tiny elite ruling class who benefit most from this dying and destructive economic system of capitalism.What the U.S. did, in collusion with its European imperialist allies, has already provoked a strong response in Latin America.The foreign minister of Venezuela, Elias Jaua, said: “All the countries that have denied permission for the flight of our brother president, Evo Morales, must be held responsible for his life and his dignity as president.” (Associated Press, July 2)An extraordinary meeting of the Union of South American Nations has been convened for July 4 in the Bolivian city of Cochabamba to discuss what happened.Bolivia filed a complaint with the United Nations on July 3 over what it termed the “kidnapping” of its president. The Bolivian ambassador to the United Nations, Sacha Llorenti, said the enforced rerouting to Austria was an act of aggression and a violation of international law.The British Guardian wrote on July 3, “The U.S. admitted that it had been in contact with other nations over potential flights by Snowden.”This outrageous incident will not be forgotten. Washington hopes it will intimidate any country that might offer Snowden asylum. Progressive people hope it will stiffen the resolve of those all over the world who are willing to resist the dictates of the imperialists.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

12 Jun

Journalist gunned down in Zacatecas state after photographing murder victims

first_imgNews December 16, 2020 Journalist gunned down in Zacatecas state after photographing murder victims Reports RSF_en May 5, 2021 Find out more Twitter Receive email alerts Jaime Castaño Zacarías, the editor of the PrensaLibreMx news website, was gunned down on 9 December as he was returning from covering an event in the west of the town for the mayor, for whom he also worked.According to colleagues contacted by RSF and witnesses quoted by the newspaper La Jornada, Castaño stopped on his way back to photograph the bodies of two men who had just been murdered. When told him to delete his photos by a man at the scene (at which the police had not yet arrived), Castaño refused and drove off. A few kilometres further on, he was caught up by another car whose occupants opened fire, killing him on the spot.“The local authorities must shed all possible light on the Jaime Castaño’s execution-style murder,” said Emmanuel Colombié, the head of RSF’s Latin America desk. “The level of violence against the Mexican media is appalling. We call on both local and federal authorities to take stock of journalists’ extreme vulnerability and do what is necessary to guarantee their safety in this region and the rest of the country.”Castaño was an experienced photo-journalist who had worked for years for the regional newspaper El Sol de Zacatecas. He posted articles about the environment on PrensaLibreMx, as well as other stories. The authorities have so far made no official statement about the investigation into his murder and RSF was unsuccessful in its attempts to reach Jerez’s mayor or the Zacatecas state prosecutor’s office.Jerez has seen many murders and abductions since August, along with frequent clashes between two of Mexico’s most dangerous and powerful cartels, the Jalisco Nueva Generación cartel and the Sinaloa cartel. A total of 26 murders were reported in the region during the past weekend, 14 of them in the town alone.At least seven other journalists have been murdered in connection with their work in 2020 in Mexico, making it the world’s deadliest country for the media. This year’s seven other victims are Arturo Alba Medina, Israël Vázquez Rangel, Julio Valdivia Rodríguez, Pablo Morrugares, Víctor Fernando Álvarez Chávez, Jorge Miguel Armenta Ávalos and Maria Elena Ferral Hernández.Mexico is ranked 143rd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2020 World Press Freedom Index . News Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls for urgent reinforced protection for journalists in Mexico, where the spiral of violence against the media has taken another fatal victim, this time a photojournalist based in Jerez, a town in the north-central state of Zacatecas. Newscenter_img to go further Help by sharing this information AmericasMexico Protecting journalists Freedom of expressionViolence May 13, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Mexico April 28, 2021 Find out more AmericasMexico Protecting journalists Freedom of expressionViolence Organisation NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policieslast_img read more