23 Jun

Championship final 2nd leg: Bristol v London Welsh

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS By Richard GraingerLONDON WELSH bounced back to the top flight at the first attempt despite a brave Bristol fightback at the Memorial Stadium on Wednesday night.Bristol, who finished eight points ahead of second-placed Welsh at the end of the regular season, took a 19-point deficit into their final game at the Mem. But soggy conditions and wayward place-kicking from ex-Wales International Nicky Robinson didn’t help their cause.“We left a lot of points out there and had enough opportunities, but we have to be able to take those,” said Bristol DoR Andy Robinson after the 21-20 defeat (48-28 on aggregate). “It’s something we will look at going into next season. I thought it was an outstanding performance. The character we showed was excellent, but we were left to chase too much.”Nicky Robinson, who was eventually replaced by Adrian Jarvis, was off-target with three kickable penalties and two conversions, one of which was from the touchline.A fired-up Bristol dominated the first quarter but failed to put points on the board. Indeed, it was a drop-goal from Sky Sports Man of the Match Gordon Ross, on Welsh’s first sortie out of their own half, that stretched the aggregate gap to 22 points.No way through: Bristol’s Ben Glynn meets a resolute London Welsh defence at the Memorial GroundAs Welsh quietened the crowd thanks to their organisation and discipline in defence, a delightfully weighted Robinson cross-kick found Andy Short on the left flank and he shrugged off two weak tackles to slither over in the corner.Robinson failed to convert and Ross nudged the Exiles back into the lead as Bristol, whose scrum had started competitively, collapsed to concede a penalty.On the stroke of half-time, Exiles scrum-half Chris Cook was sentenced to an extended interval break when he was adjudged to have knocked on deliberately to prevent Short collecting a pass for his second, but all that intense Bristol pressure could produce was a Robinson penalty to give Bristol an 8-6 interval lead.Mitch Eadie roused the Bristol faithful when he touched down on the hosts’ first attack after the break. Robinson couldn’t add the extras nor a penalty from an Exiles scrum collapse and that transpired to be his last action of this season. Replacements: Vella, Bristow, Tideswell, West, Stedman, Lewis, Crane.For more league winners from across the country, see the Champions section of the July 2014 issue of Rugby World – on sale now. Aviva Premiership rugby will return to Kassam Stadium next season thanks to London Welsh’s 20-point aggregate win over promotion favourites Bristolcenter_img Red-letter day: London Welsh celebrate with the Championship trophy after their final victory There was real belief when Adam Hughes finished off a fine break by Ben Mosses and Jarvis converted to bring Bristol within eight points with ten minutes to go. Game on.Welsh hit back with two tries in two minutes to slam the door on Bristol’s Premiership aspirations. First, after a TMO referral, James Tideswell was adjudged to have touched down when an Exiles maul reached the Bristol try-line. Then silence descended when Seb Stegmann hacked on three times from his own 22 before collecting the ball and diving over.Ross converted to put the Exiles 21-20 ahead and into the Premiership, and to conclude 92 years of Bristol rugby at the Memorial Stadium.Welsh head coach Justin Burnell said: “Bristol are a good side and I feel for Andy Robinson. I don’t think they took us for granted, but if you don’t kick the points it’s disappointing.”Bristol will have the summer to ponder how to better Worcester and an improving Leeds outfit for promotion next season.Bristol: Wallace; Amesbury, Tovey, Mosses, Short; Robinson, Tipuna (capt); Traynor, Johnston, Cortes, Glynn, Townson, Koster, Mama, Eadie.Replacements: Lawrence, Hall, Hobson, Skirving, Grindal, Jarvis, Hughes.London Welsh: Awcock; Stegmann, May (capt), Jewell, Scott; Ross, Cook; Trevett, Morris, Edwards, Spencer, Corker, Lees, Kirwan, Thorpe.last_img read more

23 Jun

What’s in the new issue of Rugby World?

first_img THE LATEST edition of Rugby World has everything you need to know about the 2015 Six Nations. There are features on every team, views from inside each camp, predictions on who will win as well as a look at the women’s and U20 tournaments.We also preview the new Super Rugby season, debate whether winning is important in mini rugby and ask Jonny Wilkinson for his drop-goal tips. And if you missed the February issue, you’ll also be able to enjoy the magazine’s new look.Here’s a list of contents – and find out where to buy your copy here or get our free magazine finder app here. Plus, download the digital edition here.NEWSThe story behind the new Six Nations trophy, players to watch in the U20 Six Nations, the pros and cons of Friday night fixtures, a Gareth Thomas play, 30 Minutes with Bradley Davies, Hotshots and a salary cap rantCOLUMNISTS Keith Wood – The former hooker on Ireland’s Six Nations chancesThe Secret Player – This former international gives an insight into the pro gameChris Cusiter – The scrum-half raises awareness about men’s health issuesSPOTLIGHTS Dan Cole – The England prop talks books, brains and breaks from the gameRhys Ruddock – The man with a famous father is now in the limelightHallam Amos – The young Dragons flyer talks through his future with WalesBlair Cowan – The London Irish flanker on his rise to the Scotland team TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS A full list of contents for the March 2015 edition – a Six Nations special!center_img FEATURESSix Nations predictions – Ex-England fly-half Stuart Barnes runs the rule over each of the teams and picks his winner of the 2015 championshipEngland – Flanker Tom Wood on pundits, pressure and playhousesFrance – Bernard le Roux talks through his journey from South Africa to ParisIreland – Devin Toner prepares to defend Ireland’s Six Nations titleItaly – Stephen Jones gives his hard-hitting verdict on the state of Italian rugbyScotland – Former Test centres analyse the contenders for the Scottish midfieldWales – Meet the prop who’s going from strength to strength, Samson Lee (below)Inside the camp – We get the views from players and coaches of each of the six teams, including Graham Rowntree, Greig Laidlaw and Gethin JenkinsWomen’s Six Nations – England’s Sarah Hunter and Natasha Hunt on how life has changed since winning the Women’s World Cup last yearThe Big Debate – Should winning be scrapped in kids’ rugby?Super Rugby – Get to know Will Skelton, the giant lock who will be key to the Waratahs’ title defence. Plus, the key player for every teamRugby World Meets – We put your questions to John Feehan, the man who’s in charge of the Lions, Six Nations and Guinness Pro12ADVICE SECTION Pro Insight – Jonny Wilkinson (below) explains how to drop a goal Nutrition – How to eat for endurance, plus a soup recipeFitness – How to throw a pass as far as Conor MurrayPro Playbook – A slice move for wingersMini Rugby – Play Mice & Monsters and how to tackleREGULARS Rugby Focus – A news round-up from clubs, schools and women’s rugby, including an interview with Australia sevens player Alicia QuirkEssentials – The latest books and productsUncovered – Italy’s Luke McLean on his journey from Australia to ManchesterTour Tale – What happened when England watched a sheep-shearing demonstration?last_img read more

23 Jun

Martin Scelzo

first_img Playing at tighthead prop is rarely, if ever, a case of rocking up to a big stage for the first time, packing down and blowing everyone away. More often, playing at No 3 means honing your craft and taking your beatings over time until you’re the most resourceful and resilient scrummager.It’s with that spirit of endeavour that Martin Scelzo rose to international renown. A Test player in 1996, any glamour in those early years of professionalism passed him by as he continued to graft at the famous, amateur Hindu club.It wasn’t until after the 1999 World Cup that the tighthead was lured from his homeland, playing a part in Northampton’s only Heineken Cup victory in 2000. He was continuing to learn.Scelzo had a number of team-mates to contend with during his time. Omar Hasan, Mauricio Reggiardo and later Juan Figallo all vied with Scelzo to be a starter. But the Pumas tighthead is not an easy role. So much onus is placed on the scrummage, and so much passion flows through the pack, that the exhaustion can go bone-deep. Scelzo kept picking himself up. By the time the 2007 World Cup rolled around, Scelzo was 31 and had learned things the hard way. Domestically he had played a major role in changing the identity of his club Clermont – to this day coach Vern Cotter calls him “a legend” for the work he did. Internationally, he was one third of a terrifying front three, alongside Rodrigo Roncero and Mario Ledesma. Major teams: Northampton, Narbonne, Clermont, AgenCountry: Argentina Test span: 1996-2011Argentina caps: 59 (33 starts)Test points: 50 (10T) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Sometimes people find their place and time in the world. For Scelzo it was that 2007 World Cup in France. He was magnificent in the set-piece and unforgiving in the loose.After dominating for a few more years he would play in a fourth World Cup, but would never reach the same standard. For a brief window he was a true world master. TAGS: The Greatest Players last_img read more

23 Jun

Behind The Scenes at the LA Sevens

first_imgWith rugby in a competitive sports market here though, explains Somerville, they will need “a running, razzmatazz, exciting team or they are just wasting their time” because “LA wants a show – that’s just the way it is!”Certainly you can feel the concerted effort to create the eye-popping here.Overhead: Kenya v Samoa in Carson (Getty Images)While execs may wish cameras saw many more bums on seats when the US, Kenya or Fiji aren’t playing, organisers are delighted with the turnout – an attendance figure of 17,436 for day one is reported, while the official site claims nearly 30,000 were here over the whole weekend – and there is heavy foot traffic on the concourse ringing the main stands. Cameras click away as players leave the tunnel. There’s even a star cameo from a familiar TV face.Enter David Hasselhoff, who powers into action on day two with a Baywatch-style float in one hand, beaming at us through make-up.“Sevens is the best thing about rugby,” happy Hasselhoff tells Rugby World. “Because you get a chance to relax, you see the players and you actually get a chance to watch them run. And when you watch, like, Wales playing England (in the Six Nations) it’s incredible but it’s a much slower game. This is so fast. And the best part about it is it’s seven minutes. You can see 16 teams in a weekend. How cool is that?“I love rugby. It’s absolutely a fun game. But LA needs better promotion because it’s huge worldwide.”Hasselhoff makes that call in the eye of a whirlwind of activity with HSBC ambassadors Brian O’Driscoll and USA women’s player Alev Kelter, tossing the ball around and scrumming down. But he is not the only one who can see potential to draw more punters to this competition, if promotion ramps up.At the mouth of the tunnel leading out to the pitch we bump into Jason Raven, who played for the Eagles when the sevens was first here in the early Noughties. He comments that in other established rugby markets, events like this are flagged well ahead of time with “signage and commercials” weeks in advance. But he has noticed a lack of that in LA in the lead-up to this event.Baywatching: David Hasselhoff (Mike Lee/World Rugby)Yet it’s worth noting that this is the first run back here with the modern Series and Raven is still pumped up, extolling: “It’s huge having the sevens here in LA again. One, because USA are doing so much better on the circuit than we were back then. And two, because the rugby community’s been built up tremendously.“We have one of the fastest-growing sports in the US, we have youth programmes all over the country and we are now starting to see players like Marcus (Tupuolu) who have came out of a youth programme like that.“Having an event here in the US and in Canada is huge too – so it’s more like the Australian and New Zealand combo, but with two North American countries. It’s just a great atmosphere.“It works because of the weather – I’ve played in Scotland where it’s ‘Great, a wet ball!’ – and it being so dry and nice all the time, it helps a West Coast, ‘run and gun’ type of style. And to be honest, the more the fans get into it, the better the USA play, and vice versa.”On the field the Eagles get fans on their feet, but the real marvel of the weekend is a final in which Fiji run away with it in the first half against the Blitzboks, only for the South Africans to come roaring back in the second as a Branco du Preez try in the corner is followed by an impossibly ballsy conversion from the touchline by the same man. He takes it to 24-24 at the final hooter. In sudden death, a muscular turnover by Chris Dry nabs ball for Sakoyisa Makata to score the winner.Hard work: Australia the day before (Mike Lee/World Rugby)The weekend brings plenty of other highlights. Fiji’s Sevuloni Mocenacagi throws possibly the pass of the season with an outrageous back-of-the-hand bullet against Australia. The Kenyans are in the mood to dance back to the changing rooms, Kevon Williams wins the Jon Prusmack Award for the Eagles’ unsung hero and there’s even the odd tail-gate grill spotted in the car park.Former Bath and USA No 8 Dan Lyle played a big part in putting this event on. Sleep, it’s safe to say, was affected in the nights before. He reveals of the job: “You have to challenge yourself to say, ‘Okay, what are the things that you can do in year one and what are the things that you can do in year two?’“Across the board, we look at what you have in the festival and in the crowd, whether people of all different nationalities and of all different agescan be part of that, what makes it accessible, what makes it fun and what makes it an experience.“But oftentimes you are trying to do too many things for too many different people. So what we have to learn in year one is what really works.”We know they have sun and palm trees, Hollywood ideals and fans who love a slick of glitz. We know there can be a bang on the field. That’s light, cameras… Let’s see plenty of action in year two.This feature first appeared in Rugby World magazine in April. With the USA leg of the World Sevens Series in Los Angeles for the first time since 2006, we headed to the City of Angels. This feature first appeared in Rugby World in April. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Behind The Scenes at the LA SevensAWAY FROM the smoke machines and bacon-wrapped hotdogs inside Dignity Health Sports Park, there is a whole other world of invitationalLA Sevens taking place on the fields skirting the soccer stadium.As the US leg of the HSBC World Rugby Sevens Series fizzes away, outside boys’ teams, women’s sides and touring outfits vie for supremacy and a chance to play a final on that big pitch.Amongst that hustling variety is a USA Falcons team made up of athletes hoping to push their way into Eagles contention for the Olympic Games. And in their ranks is one Marcus Tupuola.The last time a sevens leg took place in Los Angeles County, in 2006, it was here in Carson, where Tupuola is from.“I remember coming here when I was young and I would never have envisioned being here again playing rugby, so this is amazing,” the grinning back, 24, tells Rugby World. “I’m glad for the city because the kids here can see what rugby is now. It was missing in the past but now it’s growing – my old high school has a girls’ team now and a lot of them can get college scholarships, full rides. When I was a senior I played rugby but it wasn’t as relevant then.”Jumping off: At the start of day one (Andrew Lau/HSBC)Which will be music to the ears of World Rugby and their big sponsors, with locals believing that a major event here can inspire another generation.We are continually told rugby numbers are growing rapidly in the US and young girls populate an area of the pie chart that officials say is swelling. But according to Tupuola, there is another reason why having this event to show the children of this zipcode a different path is important.“Out here sports can lead us away from the streets,” he explains candidly. “Around here it can be a little hectic, so it’s good (for youngsters) to have another outlet. That’s why I got into rugby.“What I’ve seen people go through, I don’t want that to be me. I’ve got best friends in jail, friends that even died in high school. Flip of the coin it could have been me, so I’m blessed to be able to sit here and talk to you now.”NBC are showing all the games in LA – with a unique system of airing big ones live and taping others to show during natural breaks in the day – while HSBC have a cameraman embedded with the USA team, for a documentary later in the year. All of which can thrill a nation now, but the dream for Tupuola is that others from Carson will be inspired to sprint headlong into an ever-evolving local rugby landscape.However, there are some here who can explain how the game in and around LA has developed just to get to this point.Hollywood sign: US Fans (Alan Dymock)On day one of the tournament, on 29 February (sadly there are no pitchside proposals), there is something that feels unique to USA legs of the series. In one corner is a stronghold of Kenyan fans, who are rowdier, more colourful and just as popular as the fans of Fiji. They draw outsiders to them like a pot of honey, and it’s at the top steps of their section that we bump into Joseph Somerville, from Belmont Shore RFC based in Long Beach. Beside him is Ken Te’o, dad of USA sevens and 15s cap Mike, who is playing on the outer fields with Tupuola.According to ‘Big Joe’, Southern Californian rugby in the Nineties was all about a duel between OMBAC out of San Diego, who had a large numberof front-line Eagles in their team, and Belmont Shore, who had many of the USA’s back-ups knitted in with other multicultural influences – with Kiwis, South Africans and a hefty number of Polynesians migrating to the area.“Basically, the viewpoint of all of America back in 1997 was that you had to be in Southern California if you wanted to be an Eagle,” Somerville says.And while today we continually hear those with a passing interest musing whether rugby in the States could benefit from athletes from other sports switching to rugby, in Long Beach they are familiar with the remoulding process.Saying hi: Perry Baker with fans (Mike Lee/World Rugby)Joe jumps back in: “We also get a lot of guys who aren’t ‘fresh off the boat’ feeding our team. We got guys who grew up playing American Football but they’re (second generation) Samoans. Their uncles made them learn rugby too.“We probably had the hardest suburban white guys in the world because they had to put up; they had to go get their butts beat by Samoans and Tongans and Fijians while growing up!“Ken’s kid is exactly what I’m talking about because he went to Long Beach Poly to play Football. Then at 15 or 16 he came over to us and now he’s an Eagle.”Related: New Olympic dates clash with Lions tourSomerville makes clear that he loved the ‘party’ lifestyle of rugby in the Eighties and Nineties, but he can see a real ramping up of standards in the area. It’s all about outlets. Both men proudly proclaim that many of Belmont Shore’s best players gravitated towards Major League Rugby’s San Diego outfit, the Legion. Now, if the proposed LA Loyals franchise takes root, they imagine many will return to Greater Los Angeles. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

23 Jun

Who is George Martin: Find out more about England’s new back-row

first_img Leicester Tigers’ George Martin in action against Bath (Getty Images) The Leicester Tiger is set to win his first cap for England against Wales this weekend Six things you should know about George Martin1. George Martin was born on 18 June 2001 in Nottingham. He stands at 6ft 6in (1.98m) and weighs 118kg (18st 8lb).2. Martin had made seven senior appearances and scored one try for Leicester Tigers before being named in England’s match-day 23 to play Wales. His first score for his club came in their match against Harlequins in February 2021.3. England head coach Eddie Jones has praised the 19-year-old’s work ethic and has suggested he could move to the second row in the future, saying: “With time he may be able to play lock as well.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Who is George Martin: Find out more about England’s new back-rowLeicester Tigers back-row George Martin is set to make his England debut this weekend as he has been named as a replacement for their Six Nations match against Wales.Martin was origianlly named in Eddie Jones’s ‘shadow squad’ for the championship and was called up to the senior set-up after Wasps’ Jack Willis suffered a serious knee injury against Italy in the second round.Martin is also familiar with long lay-offs having suffered a serious knee injury himself against London Irish in August 2020 – just a few days after making his Premiership debut against Bath – that took him out of the game for the rest of the year. He has since fully recovered and returned to the pitch for Leicester in January.center_img Jones added: “George is very much an old fashioned six – good defensive ability, carries the ball hard and is also a lineout option.“He’s got a big body on him and we’re so lucky he’s been well-coached at Leicester by Steve Borthwick, so he comes in with a really good work ethic. If he keeps working hard he’s going to be a good player.” Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. 4. He is an avid supporter of Leicester City and played more football than rugby when he was younger after first picking up an oval ball aged nine at Fairfield Preparatory School in Loughborough.5. He has represented England at U18 level and captained the team during the 2018-19 season.6. Martin’s brother, Felix, has played rugby for Loughborough Grammar School and Loughborough RFC.last_img read more

20 Jun

‘Pastor Sadie’ waits (mostly) patiently for racial equality

first_img‘Pastor Sadie’ waits (mostly) patiently for racial equality Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ethnic Ministries, Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Submit an Event Listing By Sharon SheridanPosted Feb 29, 2012 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Advocacy Peace & Justice, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Comments (1) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab center_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York David Burwell Johnson says: Rector Tampa, FL [Episcopal News Service] This is the last in a series of interviews ENS is publishing during Black History Month featuring interviews with Episcopalians involved in the civil rights movement and the church’s work of reconciliation.A lifelong Philadelphia resident, the Rev. Sadie Mitchell says she never experienced the blatant discrimination that African-Americans did in the South, nor did the civil rights movement bring the sort of unrest to her city that it did to places like Selma, Alabama.But, at 91, she admits to occasional impatience with the pace of full desegregation in the church and the rest of American society.“Who wouldn’t get impatient when you want something and it’s not readily available?” she asked.Living in Philadelphia, she said, “I was not restricted any place where I went.” If some place did discriminate against African-Americans, “my mother always protected us.”“There was a movie [house] in West Philadelphia that directed black children to the balcony,” she recalled. Her mother didn’t let her go there.Most restaurants served all races, she said. “I would say in a city as big as Philadelphia, you had maybe three or four restaurants that may not have allowed blacks in their restaurants, and they were on Broad Street and in Center City, mostly. That went away so fast when civil rights began its movement that it made no dent in my life at all.”But that doesn’t mean there weren’t inequities. “We were not as blatant in the discrimination and segregation on the North … but they still went on. For instance, we had black schools and white schools. Nobody ever speaks of that, but we did. There were certain schools in certain areas that were considered all black. No white children attended those schools at all.”Schools in northeast Philadelphia were all white unless black families with children moved to the neighborhood, she said.After the civil rights movement began, “after all that was going on in the South, the tenor seemed to change and you had a different thinking of whites – some whites, not all whites – and [black] children were allowed to come up to those schools, but not in droves, not in large numbers until the schools were [legally] demanded to desegregate and they were demanded to use buses to desegregate,” she said. “When they started doing that, you had white children coming into certain black schools in certain areas, and you had black children going into certain white schools by bus in the northeast, and then little by little, with faculty and students, you began to have some desegregation.”From 1969 to the late 1980s, Mitchell served as principal at three all-black schools in succession, the first located in a white neighborhood. While many people claimed that educational inequities existed between Philadelphia’s black and white schools, the differences were “not quite as dire” as in the South.“There were not inequities in my three schools,” she said. “I knew how much money I was getting, and I knew how to order the books and other materials, so I never allowed us to have a dearth of materials.”Educational directives came from the state, “so everyone was to teach the same thing. Now what we did teach in the black schools, which some of the white schools refused to teach … was black history.”Mitchell participated in one civil rights march, part of a successful effort to break the will that restricted admission to Girard College. “That was not a real college. They called it a college, but it was a school for white boys only,” she explained.The march was “very quiet,” she said. “Except for talking, you didn’t hear a sound. There was no violence. We just walked with banners.“That was the only march I took place in. I did not go down to the South for the marches down there.” But the Rev. Jesse Anderson Sr., rector of the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas that she attended, did march in the South and also invited the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. to speak at the church. The Rev. Absalom Jones, first black priest ordained in the Episcopal Church, founded St. Thomas in 1792.Mitchell supported the movement and King’s nonviolent philosophy. “The movement was something that needed to be pushed and pushed and pushed, because it was time. From slavery times until now, it was time for some movement to take place. I was all in favor without any equivocation, but not in favor of the violence.”On the night King was assassinated in 1968, Mitchell was attending a meeting at a school as assistant to the district superintendent. “The program was stopped. We were allowed to leave early … because everyone was up in arms about this death, and they just couldn’t believe it. These were whites and blacks, mostly whites.”Although she worked in education, Mitchell long had been interested in the ministry and felt “the call” following the “irregular” ordination of 11 women to the priesthood in Philadelphia in 1974. General Convention subsequently approved women’s ordination in 1976. She was ordained a deacon in 1987 and a priest in 1988, becoming an assistant at St. Thomas a year later. Although retired from that position, “Pastor Sadie” continues to serve in the parish.“Priests do not retire,” she said. “You just get up there when you can.”While still a member of the laity, she served on the diocesan Restitution Commission, formed in response to civil rights leader James Foreman’s “demand that the ‘white church’ supply reparations to the black community,” said Arthur Sudler, director of the St. Thomas Historical Society. “In large measure the RC mirrored the church’s controversial General Convention Special Program inaugurated by Presiding Bishop John E. Hines” to combat poverty and injustice in black urban areas.“The black members of the RC disagreed amongst themselves about the way in which the organization should operate – especially in regard to the issuance of funds to community organizations,” Sudler said.Ultimately, Mitchell and Anderson, also a member, left the commission. “I do not feel that we had enough knowledge of what we were doing,” she said. “We seemed to be floundering … it didn’t go anyplace.”Today, she said, “the churches are still segregated, but the segregation is lessening, because you don’t have white people afraid to come into black churches anymore, and you don’t have black people afraid to go into white churches anymore. … We have quite a few whites who have joined St. Thomas, and that’s considered an all-black church.”But she perceives a lack of leadership by some clergy in combating segregation beyond participating in the civil rights marches. There are white clergy who “will not speak out in their churches,” she said. “Now, that is not everybody, but that’s enough to make a problem. They didn’t speak out before, and they’re not speaking out now. So you have pockets of segregation, where if the priest would open his mouth and talk to his congregation, he could bring something about. … You still have clear white pockets all over in every diocese across the country.”“A lot more has to be done to recognize full equality,” she said. “But it is moving, and like all progress, it is slow.”In the broader society, she said she was surprised but happy when President Barack Obama became president, “but I think what is going on now is a disgrace,” she said, citing verbal attacks on him that she believes are racially motivated. “I just decry all of that, and I wish it would be over.”But she remains optimistic about the future of race relations.“I do feel hopeful, even though it’s taking a long time. I feel hopeful that this situation is going to right itself, and I do believe God is working in his timeframe, taking the time to see all this through and coming to a point where it meets his live and his peace,” she said. “The peace of God and the love of God, I feel, will shine through. But I think God is taking his time to do that.”“I’ll never see desegregation fully,” she predicted, “but I hope to see more of it within the few years that I have. And it is happening every day. It is happening every day in some place or some places.”—Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing March 1, 2012 at 10:48 am It is truly wonderful to hear this story of our people- the story Americans of Color- illuminated by a citizen of the world who has lived through the segregation of the 60s, 70s, 80s, 90s, and 00s, her perspective sheds a much needed light on the fact that more work must be done with regard to desegregation – in the Episcopal Church, and in America! We are still on the journey of equality. We must continue to work together in new and different ways to create a society that REFLECTS the founding fathers Declaration of Independence. Racial Justice & Reconciliation Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH last_img read more

20 Jun

Ecumenical panel kicks off UN forum on indigenous issues

first_img Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ecumenical panel kicks off UN forum on indigenous issues Sarah Eagle Heart (right), the Episcopal Church’s missioner for indigenous ministries, reads a prayer following “Churches Disavow the Doctrine of Discovery: Calling for Poverty Alleviation and Healing” panel on the first day of the 11th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. ENS photo/Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service] In the 1850s, native people living in the western United States signed “peace” treaties with the U.S. Government in exchange for land; land that was to provide a safe homeland and economic opportunities, explained Cheryle Kennedy, chairwoman of the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde of western Oregon, during an ecumenical panel discussion May 7 at the United Nations Church Center.A century later, in 1954, in an “act of termination,” when the government took the land back and stripped the native people of their indigenous status, “many bad things happened, but we were not broken,” she continued.In the 1970s, the confederated tribes resolved to overturn the government’s decision and by 1983 their indigenous status had been restored; in 1986, 10,000 acres had been returned. Since then, Kennedy said, they’ve been buying back land “acre by acre.”The Episcopal Church and other faith groups were among the sponsors of the U.N. panel session, titled “Churches Disavow the Doctrine of Discovery: Calling for Poverty Alleviation and Healing,” which sought to address education, land rights, reconciliation, healing and practical next steps. It was attended by nearly two dozen people.The panel discussion took place on the first day of the 11th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII), meeting May 7 – 18 and themed “The Doctrine of Discovery: Its enduring impact on indigenous peoples and the right to redress for past conquests (articles 28 and 37 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples).The “Doctrine of Discovery” refers to international laws that were understood to set forth the ways in which colonial powers laid claim to newly discovered territories beginning in the early 1500s and continuing through the 1700s. (Throughout the 19th century, it was believed that the United States, specifically people of Anglo-Saxon descent, were destined to expand across the continent, in what was referred to as “Manifest Destiny.”)The 2009 meeting of the General Convention of the Episcopal Church passed a resolution (2009-D035) repudiating the Doctrine of Discovery. The Anglican Church of Canada took a similar action in 2010, followed by the World Council of Churches in 2012.In addition to Kennedy, the panel included Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori; Robert J. Miller, a professor at Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, Ore.; and Sarah Augustine, director of the Suriname Indigenous Health Fund and a member of the Mennonite Church.Sarah Eagle Heart, the Episcopal Church’s missioner for indigenous ministries, moderated the panel, which began with the screening of a video produced by the Episcopal Church that explores the lasting impact of the Doctrine of Discovery.The hurt left by the doctrine on North America’s native people can be seen in the form of high suicide rates, alcohol and drug abuse, and the prevalence of violence and rape. It’s not easy to enter into the work of reconciliation; and it’s easier for non-native people to walk away and ignore the acts of their ancestors, said Eagle Heart.“It’s much, much harder to sit together and face the pain,” she said. “Healing from excruciating pain is still needed today.”Following the eviction from the Garden of Eden, the Bible is full of stories that focus on human communities and their striving to return “to a homeland that will be a source of blessing for the whole community, said Jefferts Schori during the panel.“Through the long centuries, the prophetic understanding of that community has broadened to include all the nations of the earth. Even so, the seemingly eternal struggle between dominators and stewards continues to the present day.“Most of the passages in the Bible that talk about land are yearning for a fertile place, where people are able to grow crops, and tend flocks, and live together in peace. The offspring of those first human beings gave rise to people who hungered for land, and many of them did a great deal of violence through the ages in order to occupy and possess it. The Christian empires of Europe were consumed with battles over land for centuries, and eventually sent military expeditions across the Mediterranean in a quest to re-establish a Christian claim on what they called the Holy Land,” she continued.Miller, the law professor, talked briefly about international law and the Doctrine of Discovery, going back to the Crusades, when Rome and the Christian monarchies of Europe set out to dominate the world and subjugate and enslave all non-Christian people.In 1436, Pope Eugene IV issued a papal bull giving control and sovereignty of the Canary Islands to Portugal, rather than Spain, which then sent Portugal on the path to colonization down the western coast of Africa. Spain, feeling left out, headed west. In 1493, Pope Alexander VI issued four papal bulls that, in effect, divided the “new world” in half; splitting it between Spain and Portugal, said Miller.“When the Europeans showed up, native people lost title to their land,” he said.Other European nations followed, staking claim to territories by planting flags and crosses, but it wasn’t until 1823, with Johnson v. McIntosh, that the United States defined the Doctrine of Discovery, as “discovery” and “conquest,” limiting tribal land and sovereignty rights. The court case, which involved a land dispute between two white men in Indiana, became the international model, added Miller.Even today, said Augustine, indigenous people are being “colonized.” Augustine works with indigenous people in Suriname who have been displaced and made sick by the growth of the mining industry in that small South American country, which until 1975 belonged to the Netherlands.“The people I help need help every day,” said Augustine, urging those present to encourage aid to indigenous people through the support of grassroots movements. She also urged support for nations such as Suriname and the United States to adopt the U.N. rights of indigenous people into their constitutions.The May 7 panel was co-sponsored by the Episcopal Church, the Anglican Communion, the World Council of Churches, the Mennonite Central Committee, the World Federation of Methodist and Uniting Church Women, The Grail (an international women’s movement), the Gray Panthers, U.F.E.R. – International Movement for Fraternal Union among Races and Peoples, Suriname Indigenous Health Fund, the NGO Committee on the U.N. International Decade of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, the Salvation Army, the World Christian Student Federation, and Office of the Chaplain of the Church Center for the United Nations.— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Indigenous Ministries Comments are closed. Ecumenical & Interreligious, Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC May 13, 2012 at 8:55 pm So glad to see this report here. Would like to see reports of the other activities that week as well. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Comments (1) Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Margaret Harris says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA By Lynette WilsonPosted May 7, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

20 Jun

Council conversations, action focus on communion life

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Anglican Consultative Council spends much of its time in Auckland gathering in small groups for conversation. Here Episcopal Church member Josephine Hicks, left, the Rev. Maria Christina Borges Alvarez of Cuba, Scottish Primus David Chillingworth and Church of Pakistan Bishop Humphrey Peters (back to camera) listen as the Rev. Canon Dickson Chilongani, of the Anglican Church in Tanzania, far left, speaks. ENS photo/Mary Frances Schjonberg[Episcopal News Service — Auckland, New Zealand] The Anglican Consultative Council during its session here Nov. 6 (local time) continued to consider how the life of the communion might be enhanced and deepened.Their discussions focused on the Anglican Covenant, the four instruments of communion (which include the ACC) and the Continuing Indaba project.The council hit a minor bump on the way to approving a resolution on the Continuing Indaba project during which some members raised the issue of whether that process can be expected to be used to help the communion solve difficult issues. The resolution encourages further development of project, which has during the past three years helped to enable conversation across different contexts, break down barriers and build communion friendships.The council is not anticipated to take any formal action on either the covenant or the future of any of the instruments of communion.Not all of the provinces have been able to consider the covenant since it was sent to them in December 2009 because of their governance cycles, the Rev. Canon Kenneth Kearon, Anglican Communion Secretary General, said during a press briefing.The communion’s Standing Committee will meet after this ACC gathering to assess where the covenant reception process stands, according to Kearon. There will come a time, he said, after all the provinces have had their say on the covenant when the Standing Committee will no doubt say that the covenant is “operational” for those provinces that have adopted it.Those provinces will have voluntarily agreed to an “intensification of relationships” that Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams has suggested the covenant would create, Kearon said.“That’s where the difference will be seen for those who have actually adopted the covenant; not whether you are in or out communion because of what you’ve decided, which I think is sometimes the question,” Kearon said. “That’s not going to happen.”During the hour council members spent hearing a summary of each other’s thoughts on the covenant and the instruments of communion, they learned that “in places where the covenant is contentious, people remain committed to the communion, to talk, to share, to relate to each other,” according to Helen Biggin, Church in Wales.“Some groups feel we simply don’t need a covenant,” she said. “There was strong affirmation for sections 1 to 3, but considerable caution for section 4 [which outlines a process for resolving disputes]. Some of the reasons for that included a reluctance to give one group authority over another; a concern that it would make Anglicanism confessional in a way it wasn’t before [and] the thought it might be punitive.”Biggin also noted that some provinces expressed “an anxiety about whether they would then become second-class members of the communion” if they did not adopt the covenant.The Anglican Covenant first was proposed in the 2004 Windsor Report as a way that the communion and its provinces might maintain unity despite differences, especially relating to biblical interpretation and human sexuality issues. The last ACC meeting, in Jamaica in May 2009, decided to delay release of the third and final draft of the covenant to the provinces for their consideration because the ACC members thought the covenant’s process for resolving disputes needed more work.After a small working group solicited input from the provinces about that process, the final version of the covenant was released to the provinces for formal consideration in December 2009. An updated account of the status of that consideration is here.The Nov. 6 session also heard a summary of themes that emerged during the council’s small-group reflections on the past, present and possible futures of the instruments of communion. The Rev. Sarah Macneil, Anglican Church of Australia, reported that members are “overall very positive about the membership in the communion.”However, “many ACC members feel that there is a need to clarify and refine the instruments and how they relate to each other,” she noted.Joanildo Burity, Igreja Episcopal Anglicana do Brasil, said the council members “strongly affirm the value of having lay and ordained meeting together” by way of the ACC, which is the only instrument that includes Anglicans who are not bishops or primates.“We feel like the ACC is being true to its own calling” and is “rais[ing] issues for the communion in a more pro-active way,” he said.The members would like to see more laity included in the ACC, he said. The membership includes from one to three persons from each of the Anglican Communion’s 38 provinces, depending on the numerical size of each province. Where there are three members, there is a bishop, a priest and a lay person. Where fewer members are appointed, preference is given to lay membership. However, Kearon said during the briefing that often clergy and bishops are chosen for those seats.Council members suggested allotting at least two seats to each province and requiring that one of those seats be filled by a lay person, Burity said. He also added that members discussed encouraging ACC members to meet regionally between ACC meetings and promoting ongoing participation of ACC members in the life of the communion in between meetings, perhaps by formally linking them to the work of its networks.Diocese of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island Bishop Sue Moxley summarized comments on the Lambeth Conference. The members think that the admittedly expensive gathering of the communion’s bishops promotes “building collegial and trusting relationships between the bishops” but that its decennial cycle makes it hard to maintain those connections. She said the gathering also helps to quash “the rumors we have all heard about each other.”ACC members suggested regional meetings of bishops between, and perhaps instead of the conference. They also wondered if bishops ought to meet with lay and clergy before the conference so their insights might increase the scope of the conference, she said.The Very Rev. Herman Browne, Church of the Province of West Africa, said members saw the Primates Meeting as “as a gathering of mutual affirmation and for the benefit of primates themselves” in their work leading provinces. ACC members also suggested that primates communicate the work of their meetings to their provinces. The members also suggested more time needs to be spent on gaining shared understanding how individual provinces empower their primate.The Rev. Canon Dickson Chilongani, Anglican Church of Tanzania, said the members see the archbishop of Canterbury as “a symbol of our unity” and the “spiritual and historical center of our communion.” However, he said, some wonder whether the archbishop must be English or whether the position could rotate throughout the communion.The Inter-Anglican Standing Commission on Unity, Faith and Order is monitoring the reception of the covenant and conducted an initial study of the instruments of communion at the request of ACC-14. The group meets again in November 2013. The Rev. Canon Alyson Barnett-Cowan, director of unity, faith and order at the Anglican Communion Office, encouraged ACC members to continue the conversation in their provinces and send her their feedback.The conversation about the communion’s common life continued with the council considering the first three years of the Continuing Indaba project authorized by ACC-14, and its future.A process of indaba, a Zulu word meaning purposeful discussion, formed the basis for groups of around 40 bishops that met each day during the Lambeth Conference in 2008. The program, which is partly a continuation of the Anglican Communion Listening Process, has enabled Anglicans to discuss and learn about experiences from contexts far removed from their own and to wrestle with differences concerning issues such as human sexuality and theological interpretation.The hope is that it will produce a body of resources to enable deeper relationships for the sake of mission around the Anglican Communion. During the first phase there were four pilot conversations between three dioceses, each from different provinces.There is more information about those conversations here.Southern Africa Archbishop Thabo Makgoba, a member of the Lambeth Design Group that introduced the wider communion to indaba, said the process is not “about transplanting elements from one culture into a completely foreign and inappropriate context.”“It is essential to focus on the Scriptures and gain insights from the diverse cultures of the communion,” he said.Suzanne Lawson, Anglican Church of Canada, participated in one of the pilot conversations and told the council that she learned “it takes time and honest effort, and much planning in advance to develop … relationships.”“We couldn’t talk about them, we had to talk about us,” she said. “I also learned to pull myself back from stereotypes.”Lawson said the council has been engaging in the same sort of process. “I have felt indaba-ish in the last few days and those are the riches I take home,” she said.Indaba can be used, Hong Kong Archbishop Paul Kwong said, “to meet an urgent need to hold our communion together in a time of tension and real or potential division” and seeks to energize global mission.It “encourages genuine conversation across the differences; it seeks to build trust and models a way of decision-making that is not confrontation or parliamentary” but instead calls for “mutual and intense listening to deeply held opinions” and a willingness to delve deeply into Anglicans’ shared faith.Scottish Episcopal Church Primus David Chillingworth said indaba could be used to strengthen unity.“You cannot be a family just by saying you are one, or that you want to be one,” he said. “You have to place yourself in situations in which the spirit can move you, be challenged and changed.”Indaba is not a program, he said, “it is a movement, it is a way of being the church.”However, some ACC members asked that the enabling resolution they were considering include language that would direct the process toward resolving the communion’s contentious issues.Archbishop Ikechi Nwachukwu Nwosu of the Province of Aba, Church in Nigeria, was among them. He later told Episcopal News Service that he agrees with everything about the indaba project, especially because indaba is used extensively in his country. However, he said, it is indeed usually used “in conflict moments.”“Everybody’s opinion is taken on board and everybody helps to make sure that the crisis or whatever the problem is, is solved,” he said, noting that the process can take a short time or years.Nwosu said the important thing is that if there is a crisis, the community does not want it to continue so they decide, “let’s all put our heads together and see how we can solve it.”“I just wanted a little bit of that direction to be added,” he said.The council debated adding language to the resolution supporting the future of the project saying that the process ought to be used “with a view to encouraging resolution of disputed issues.” Nwosu supported that addition.ACC Chair James Tengatenga, Diocese of Malawi bishop, told the meeting that Continuing Indaba is “not a panacea” and that the members are also confronting issues of“how do we as a communion solve our problems.”Endorsing the project will not mean that the ACC thinks indaba is a “magical solution to our problems,” he said.He then asked the council to vote on whether it wanted to vote on the version of the resolution with the added language, which would have also commended further exploration of the approach to the next Lambeth Conference. When the majority of the members voted against considering the amended resolution, Tengatenga put the original resolution to them. It passed with 45 yes votes, 12 no votes and nine abstentions.Church of England Bishop Stephen Cottrell (Diocese of Chelmsford) pointed out the irony that “we’re voting on a motion on indaba and we failed to use the indaba process.”Resolution 15.21 receives the report of the Continuing Indaba project, encourages provinces to “engage with the theological underpinnings” of the project and hear the stories of the pilot conversations and requests further development of Continuing Indaba including effective communication of the project, a widening of the theological base, developing models of facilitation and facilitator training, and a commitment for ongoing evaluation.ACC backgroundThe ACC is one of the four instruments of communion, the others being the archbishop of Canterbury (who serves as president of the ACC), the Lambeth Conference of Anglican bishops, and the Primates Meeting.Formed in 1969, the ACC includes clergy and lay people, as well as bishops, among its delegates. The membership includes from one to three persons from each of the Anglican Communion’s 38 provinces, depending on the numerical size of each province. Where there are three members, there is a bishop, a priest and a lay person. Where fewer members are appointed, preference is given to lay membership. The ACC’s constitution is here.The council meets every three years or four years and the Auckland meeting is the council’s 15th since it was created.The Episcopal Church is represented by Josephine Hicks of North Carolina; the Rev. Gay Jennings of Ohio; and Bishop Ian Douglas of Connecticut.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori is attending the meeting in her role as a member of the Anglican Communion Standing Committee, which met here prior to the start of the ACC meeting. Douglas is also a member of the Standing Committee.A complete list of the ACC15 participants is here.All ENS coverage of ACC15 is here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Nov 6, 2012 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Anglican Communion, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Council conversations, action focus on communion life Covenant, instruments of communion, Continuing Indaba all get attention Rector Knoxville, TN Anglican Consultative Council Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

20 Jun

Two ordained to diaconate in Central Pennsylvania

first_imgTwo ordained to diaconate in Central Pennsylvania Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA  On Aug. 23, 2014, Bishop Robert Gepert, Bishop Provisional for the Diocese of Central Pennsylvania, ordained Carenda Baker of St. John’s, Carlisle and Sarah Ginolfi of St. Stephen’s Cathedral, Harrisburg to the Diaconate of Transitional Deacon. Deacon Sarah will be serving as Parish Missioner at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Indiana and Deacon Carenda is presently considering calls. Photo: Diocese of Central Pennsylvania Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Posted Aug 27, 2014 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL last_img read more

20 Jun

Cathlena A. Plummer of Navajoland preaches at General Convention

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT General Convention, June 29, 2015 at 9:43 pm Dear Cathlena…I have just had the opportunity to listen to this sermon you had the honor of preaching at General Convention. How strong your voice is! You have truly learned to stand in that Holy power given to you. It is wonderful to hear. When you shared that story as a seminarian with us at St. John’s in San Francisco it was such a powerful one, as I am sure the listeners at GC appreciated also. Thank you for answering the call and for so gracefully sharing the Holy Spirit’s truth of your path which is two but by the grace of God truly One.I wish I could have been present for your sermon at that grand Eucharist….for I remember in great detail and gratitude the power of the GC Eucharist in Phoenix when both sacred traditions were celebrated together. You are truly carrying on the work your father began so many years ago.Blessings abound my sister,Bonita……former Alternate Deputy to General Convention from the Diocese of California Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Video Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Navajoland, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Comments (2) Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Cathlena A. Plummer of Navajoland preaches at General Convention Rector Collierville, TN June 28, 2015 at 3:01 pm Thank you Cathleen for following the Holy Spirit into the ministry! Your voice is likely to be heard by many over the coming years and people will know that you follow the Great Shepherd yourself. I would love to be in your flock! I retired recently after some 18 years working as the Director of Health for the Ramah Navajo in New Mexico, and visited the Church of the Good Shepherd several times, although I worshipped in Grants, NM at All Saints’ Church, where we too had a wonderful loving “shepherd” (The Rev. Dr. Martin Bayang). Best wishes to you as you journey in beauty. Carolyn Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Posted Jun 27, 2015 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release]  “This is my story, this is who I am,” the Rev. Cathlena A. Plummer of Navajoland shared in her sermon to the 78th General Convention of The Episcopal Church on June 27.Bishop Michael Smith of North Dakota presided at the Eucharist.The following is the text of the sermon: A Very Good ShepherdThe Rev. Cathlena A. PlummerLet Us Pray…God, today, we ask you to give us clear minds, open spirits and loving hearts. Amen.Can I just say what a relief it is for me to finally sit down to reflect on our gospel today? How appropriate for a former shepherd from the Good Shepherd Mission in Fort Defiance, Arizona to reflect on our very own Good Shepherd, Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.As a young Navajo girl in the southeastern part of Utah, I grew up helping my mother and father with a herd of sheep that have been our sustenance as well as our extended family members.Sheep do not have a complicated life but they are creatures of habit.  Within their own flock they have leaders who they follow as they feed and there is a hierarchy that they follow and one of their number cannot usurp that position.Likewise the sheep know who their master is, their shepherd.  They will in fact come at their master’s voice and anyone else who tries is just wasting their time.If a stranger attempted to enter their pen the nervousness they would feel would be evident but when the shepherd appeared he could move through their midst as if he were one of them.I think that this comparison of us to sheep and Christ as the great shepherd is an apt one.  Those who are His spend time in His word and recognize His voice.  His flock wants to follow where He leads them, He can impart comfort and confidence.  Just as a ewe in difficult labor must rely on her shepherd, so must we rely upon Him for help through our travails.  Just as the master over a flock knows what is best for a flock because of the mind that God has given man, so is God’s knowledge of what is best for us.  And just as a predator stalks a flock so are we stalked “as our enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.”Those are just some of the parallels that can be drawn but there are also places that they cannot.  Unlike the sheep in a flock we have a complicated life.  We have other leaders that we follow. Unlike the sheep we have people who have gone against the natural leadership that should be followed.In the case of the Jews that is what happened with the Pharisees and the high priests.  Those leaders had become thieves and robbers who destroyed by their lack of godly leadership and like the hired hand who doesn’t own the sheep.  No one cared for the people as a true shepherd would his flock.Fortunately for us Christ is the shepherd.  Though we were sheep that were not of the original sheep pen we have heard and listened to His voice. But…the Bible tells us that there will be another.I want to share with you my sheep story.As a Native American growing up in the Episcopal tradition it has always been a challenge to connect two very opposite views of spirituality, that of Navajo and of Christianity.In the summer of the year 2008 I believe I was called upon, by the Great Holy Spirit to do the work of an Episcopal priest. My father, the late Rt. Rev. Steven T. Plummer, Sr., had already been gone from our world for three years.On a particular warm and sunny summer afternoon I was asked by my mother to fetch the herd of sheep that we have been raising for many years. This day they had retreated to the high cliffs thanks to the neighbor’s dogs that have always enjoyed chasing them. Two lambs, only days old, were my deepest worry for retrieving the herd before nightfall.In the middle of my search I came across a steep bend on the edge of a steep 400 foot drop at the mouth of a canyon ridge. A concave space in the cliff wall I was pressing up against was the only net of safety to keep me from falling over the edge. I drew up my strength to press on so I continued climbing. Just as I was about to turn the corner, a loud voice spoke to me in the air, I could not tell if it was inside my head, or if I was actually hearing it out in the open.  This voice sounded a lot like my father’s voice but it could not have been because my father was gone. The voice continued to speak. This time it was calling me in my Navajo name. This drew my attention. I did not know if I was hallucinating or imagining the whole incident, but I very quietly whispered, “yes?”Then the voice continued to speak to me in Navajo telling me, “as my child I am very pleased with you and I need your help with my people for they are in trouble.” Without really analyzing the situation, I pictured in my head a meeting that had happened the week before where everyone was bickering at each other about whether or not they should have more meetings because the Bishop was to visit the following month to go over financial documents in the parish. In my memory it was clear that there were voices that were not being heard, which at this meeting, included the presence of the Navajo laity. As soon as the thought disappeared from my mind the voice spoke again and said in Navajo, “you know what I speak of.”I immediately knelt down and wept. I had not heard my father’s voice in so long, so I wondered whether or not I was going insane or not. I finally stood up to continue on.  Just as I stepped forward a rush of little hooves ran passed me very quickly, and the rest of the herd followed. I was grateful I did not have to go any further up the canyon, and I waited ten paces back from the herd to make sure everyone had been accounted for.Navajo spirituality, as known to a medicine man in our tribe, is described as a soft gentle breeze. This is exactly what I felt when I was hearing the voice. Later on, when I would tell this story to my Commission On Ministry members, everyone agreed that the voice was probably my father and that it was God’s disguise to get me to listen to him in a way that I could.I remember that day vividly, almost as vividly as I remember the day my father died, so it was truly a better memory to have. From that day forward whenever I am in doubt of the presence of my father or of God, a gentle voice saying my Navajo name will come and appear and I realize then that I am right where I am supposed to be.I desire to help my people understand that Christianity and Navajo traditions are hand in hand and connect in so many ways than one. Our church has an understanding of this harmony and we call it “Hooghan Learning Circle.”Hooghan Learning Circle first of all represents the shared walk along the Sacred Way, in which we as a people are to learn to relate to the wisdom and traditions of our own Holy People and Jesus in harmony and beauty. It is an on-going development of ministry formation process that encourages and supports the emergence and carrying of the wisdom of the two spiritual traditions, Diné and Christianity for all who seek this common faith. My father implemented this ministry development process and I intend to honor his work with Hooghan Learning Circle with the help of my own theological education formation.This is my story, this is who I am, I believe in both faith traditions.  AMENThe 78th General Convention of The Episcopal Church is meeting through July 3 in Salt Lake City, UT (Diocese of Utah). The Episcopal Church’s General Convention is held every three years, and is the bicameral governing body of the Church. It comprises the House of Bishops, with upwards of 200 active and retired bishops, and the House of Deputies, with clergy and lay deputies elected from the 108 dioceses and three regional areas of the Church, at more than 800 members.The video services of the daily Eucharist during General Convention 2015 have been produced by the Episcopal Diocese of Utah.Watch the Eucharist on the Media Hub here. https://livestream.com/accounts/12656718/events/3897940/videos/91209128 Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Carolyn Finster says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Dr. Bonita Ann Palmer says: Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Rector Washington, DC General Convention 2015, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more