2 Mar

Zach Deputy Announces New Album, Premieres Rocking New Single ‘Chevrolet’

first_imgMulti-instrumentalist Zach Deputy has some big news for fans everywhere, as he’ll be releasing his fourth studio album, Wash It in the Water, on September 9th! Not only did Deputy play every single instrument on the release, but his clever fusion of hip-hop, funk, folk, and pop continues to push the envelope of style. Wash It in the Water is sure to be a feel good album that all can enjoy!To get fans excited, Deputy has shared the very first single from the album. The bright tune is called “Chevrolet,” powered by top notch guitar work backed by island rhythms. Its upbeat mood is downright infectious, and we can’t wait to hear more cuts from the new release.Without further ado, you can stream the leading single “Chevrolet” below.Says Deputy about his new music: “Because of the music I was raised on, I’ve always heard rhythm in a very tropical, Latin-esque way—it’s something that resonates in the deepest parts of me… When I was a kid my grandma would play a lot of salsa and soca and make me get up and dance to it, so in a way this is me putting my own spin on all that and bringing those sounds into a whole new era.”With the new album coming soon, Deputy will embark on a series of summer and fall tour dates in support, featuring some co-bill performances with Ballyhoo and others supporting The Keller Williams KWahtro. Don’t miss out! You can check out the full tour schedule below, and head to Zach Deputy’s website for more details.2016 Zach Deputy Tour Dates8/4/16 – Wild Bill’s Nostalgia Park – Middletown, CT8/5/16 – Rock On! Concert Cruise – Boston, MA8/12/16 – The Peach Music Festival – Scranton, PA8/13/16 – Gypsy Sally’s – Washington, DC8/19/16 – The Windjammer – Isle of Palms, SC8/20/16 – Roasting Room Lounge – Bluffton, SC8/26/16 – Mazzstock – Marlboro, NY8/27/16 – NH Hempfest & Freedom Rally – Lancaster, NH9/1/16 – Empty Glass – Charleston, SC9/2/16 – Hookahville – Pataskala, OH9/3/16 – Front Porch Festival – Stuart, VA9/4/16 – Purple Fiddle – Thomas, WV9/8/16 – Side Bar Theatre – Tallahassee, FL *9/9/16 – Vinyl – Pensacola, FL *9/10/16 – Zydeco – Birmingham, AL *9/11/16 – Terminal West – Atlanta, GA *9/12/16 – Visulite Theater – Charlotte, NC *9/13/16 – Guanabanas – Jupiter, FL *9/14/16 – Culture Room – Ft. Lauderdale, FL *9/15/16 – The Social – Orlando, FL *9/16/16 – Wormtown Music Festival – Greenfield, MA9/17/16 – Jannus Live – St Petersburg, FL *9/20/16 – Music Farm – Charleston, SC *9/21/16 – Shaka’s Live – Virginia Beach, VA *9/22/16 – Knitting Factory – Brooklyn, NY *9/23/16 – Catskill Chill Music Festival – New York, NY9/24/16 – Paradise Rock Club – Boston, MA *9/25/16 – World Cafe Live – Philadelphia, PA *9/27/16 – Rex Theatre – Pittsburgh, PA *9/30-10/1/16 – Bear Creek Bayou – New Orleans, LA10/22/16 – The Georgia Theatre – Athens, GA #11/3/16 – Saint Rocke – Hermosa Beach, CA #11/4/16 – Belly Up – San Diego, CA #11/5/16 – Marquee – Tempe, AZ #11/10/16 – Music Farm – Columbia, SC #11/17/16 – White Oak – Houston, TX #11/18/16 – Granada Theater – Dallas, TX #11/19/16 – Scoot Inn – Austin, TX #* co-bill with Ballyhoo!# supporting The Keller Williams KWahtrolast_img read more

2 Mar

Neil Young Says The Trump Era Is “Very Similar To The 60’s”

first_imgIn times of great social conflict, artists often rise to the occasion and express their unrest through art, song, and more. Music has been a popular medium for protest throughout the years, but perhaps never as strongly as that of the 1960’s counterculture movement. With America in the midst of the Vietnam War and the Civil Rights Movement, the music of the 1960’s strongly represented the sentiments of social justice.As President-elect Donald Trump is set to take office, many are fearing a new era of unjust social policies from the White House. Singer/songwriter Neil Young, an activist since the 1960’s, recently spoke about the parallels between then and now. “This time is very similar to the ’60s, as far as I can tell,” he said in an interview with Mother Jones. “The artists always reflect the times, so there’s a lot to think about, a lot of unknowns, a lot of things that are describable. This is the closest I’ve seen to the kind of ambience that made the ’60s happen. It’s not about the artist having a responsibility to do anything. They have to be artists and express themselves and everything will work out fine. It’s all going to be great. The youth of this country are not behind what is going on. We all know that. If you looked at a [political] map of the United States 25 and under, it’s all-revealing. It’s a unified map.”Though Neil Young is concerned about the troubling times, it’s also nice to see him so optimistic about the youth of this country. He continues talking about the way people will be connecting with one another, saying, “We had the Vietnam War in the ’60s, and there was a draft. The students didn’t believe in it, and it unified them. That brought the people together and made the ’60s like they were. The youth were very unified against the status quo—against the old line and the new old line. It’s the same exact thing today. Social media and young people, art, music, all communications make this one of the most active times for activism. It will be a time of change.”Let’s hope that Young is right, and more artists will usher in this time of change in the years to come.last_img read more

20 Jul

NIH says its 1millionperson health study is off to good start

first_imgThe National Institutes of Health’s All of Us health study aims to enroll 1 million participants, including children, within 6 years. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe A plan to entice 1 million people in the United States to volunteer for a huge study of health and genes is making good progress 1 year after its national launch, organizers said this week. The All of Us study run by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, has recruited 143,000 participants who have already taken surveys and visited a clinic to give blood and urine samples. Another 87,000 have at least registered for the study.Study leaders say these numbers give them confidence All of Us will reach 1 million participants within 5 or 6 years—although they will need to ramp up enrollment to reach that goal. And they expect to broaden the study’s geographic distribution, which so far largely covers just a few states.Announced by then-President Barack Obama 4 years ago, the All of Us study, which could cost $4 billion over 10 years, aims to enroll a diverse swath of U.S. inhabitants—citizens or not—who agree to share their health records and DNA on an anonymized basis. Researchers will use the data to develop “precision medicine,” or personalized treatments for others—the study participants themselves can request their genetic data but won’t receive medical help as part of the project. The 143,000 people who have given consent, taken surveys, and visited a clinic for physical measurements and to give blood and urine samples meet All of Us’s original diversity goal: Fifty-three percent are ethnic or racial minorities, far more than the 39% these groups constitute in the U.S. population. (For example, participants with self-identified African ancestry constitute 20% of the study, compared with 13% in the population.) By Jocelyn KaiserMay. 8, 2019 , 5:15 PM NIH says its 1-million-person health study is off to good startcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Dake Kang/AP Photo And 80% are from groups All of Us has defined as “underrepresented in biomedical research.” That includes gay people, rural dwellers, the elderly, and those who are disabled or don’t have good access to medical care. In just its first year, “All of Us has managed to become one of largest, most diverse research resources in history,” said NIH Director Francis Collins at a 6 May event marking the study’s anniversary.The enrollment figures are not quite as rosy as they initially appear. For one thing, NIH had already enrolled 20% of the total before May 2018 during pilot testing. And some people who sign up online will never show up at a clinic to fully participate, says NIH’s Eric Dishman, director of All of Us. However, he expects enrollment to reach 4000 people a week by next fall—on track for 1 million within 6 years—as the study adds more sites. The pace will also pick up when the study eventually begins to enroll children.To speed things up, Dishman’s staff members are tweaking the study’s original plans. For example, the health provider organizations (HPOs) enrolling many participants can now include people who don’t get health care through that HPO. And a pilot project will soon send 13,000 saliva kits to people who sign up online or by phone through the study’s “direct enrollment” process. Study staff can then quickly test these volunteers’ DNA for disease-associated markers, then later have them visit a clinic to give blood for fuller genome sequencing.All of Us has also unveiled a “research hub” that holds pooled health and survey data for participants. (A “workbench” where approved researchers can work with the full data set will go online next winter.) The data show that more than two-thirds of fully enrolled participants come from just six states with participating HPOs, with 19% of participants from Arizona (which has 2% of the U.S. population). Dishman says Arizona surged ahead because it had effective “techniques and methods” for recruiting. Although the study won’t attempt to represent the U.S. population’s geographic diversity, the distribution will even out as more volunteers join the study via direct enrollment, which could end up including half of all participants, he says.Overall, Dishman is not worried about reaching 1 million volunteers. “What I am worried about is retaining 1 million,” or keeping people from dropping out during the study’s 10-year span, he says. All of Us plans to work on that by holding community events in key cities to “gin up excitement about the program and pull people through,” he says.last_img read more