4 Jun

Common sense would light up Croom

first_imgTwitter Facebook Previous articleListen: The Last Post News Roundup April 13, 2019Next articleNo sex assault unit in Limerick despite rise in number of victims Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Call to extend Patrickswell public sewer line Email €110,700 for four Limerick Projects under Town and Village Renewal Scheme Richard O’Donoghue, Independent. Photo: Cian ReinhardtINDEPENDENT councillor Richard O’Donoghue has urged Limerick City and County Council to use “common sense” and light up the public road in front of apartments off High Street in Croom.He maintains that the area has suffered a number of ongoing issues because of the lack of public lighting,Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “This is a public area serviced by a public road. The ongoing issues are anti-social behaviour, especially at holiday time, constant break-ins in the area, with two more house break-ins and one break-in to a car again this week,” he told the Limerick Post.“The lights are there, wired and working, as agreed with Limerick City and County Council at the time that the apartments were built. Residents signed a petition to block off a roadway at the back of High Street and a light was erected to light the public roadway and agreed with the Council.“Thousands upon thousands have been wasted on investigations by the Council and others when hundreds will fix this. Lives and properties can be saved if common sense is used.“I have made countless representations on this matter. I have met on-site with Gardaí due to anti-social behaviour in the area. Countless man-hours have been wasted in an attempt to resolve this issue and my representations are going around in circles.”Cllr O’Donoghue met on-site last week with residents and the owner of the apartments.“Three poles were erected in the area to light up the public road. I discovered yesterday that the power at the main pillar box at High Street, feeding these three poles, has been disconnected,” he said.He is now calling on the local authority to restore, without any further delay, the power to the three poles lighting this public roadway.“The resources of the Gardaí and the Council can be better spent. Common sense must be used in this instance. For an outlay of little more than €200 per annum this public area could be lit and made safe,” Cllr O’Donoghue declared.There was no response from Limerick City and County Council at the time of going to print. Linkedin Heartbroken publicans call time on their Covid lockdown Printcenter_img Advertisement Patrickswell women get to the heart of the matter Limerick people will have their say on ‘bigger picture’ issues WhatsApp NewsLocal NewsPoliticsCommon sense would light up CroomBy Alan Jacques – April 11, 2019 779 TAGSCroomIndependentLimerick CountyLocal Elections 2019local newsNewspoliticsRichard O’Donoghue RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick cafe owner calls for injection centres to tackle on-street drug use last_img read more

27 Sep

Caesar, Coercion, and the Christian Conscience: A Dangerous Confusion

first_imgAlbert Mohler.com 24 February 2014Several states are now considering legislation that would provide explicit protections to citizens whose consciences will not allow an endorsement of same-sex marriage. The bills vary by state, as do the prospects for legislative passage, but the key issues remain constant. Millions of American citizens are facing a direct collision between their moral convictions and the demands of their government.The cases are now piling up. A wedding photographer in New Mexico, cake bakers in Colorado and Oregon, and a florist in Washington State have all found themselves in this predicament. Each now faces the coercive power of the state. They are being told, in no uncertain terms, that they must participate in providing services for same-sex weddings or go out of business.The bills now being considered in several states are attempts to protect these citizens from government coercion. They take the form of remedial legislation — bills intended to fix a problem. And the problem is all too real, and so is the controversy over these bills.Those pushing for the legalization of same-sex marriage are relentless in their insistence that these bills would violate the civil rights of same-sex couples. They brilliantly employed arguments from the civil rights in their push for same-sex marriage, and they now employ similar arguments in their opposition to bills that would protect the consciences of those opposed to same-sex marriage. They claim that the rights of gays and lesbians and others in the LGBT community are equivalent to the rights rightly demanded by African Americans in the civil rights movement. Thus far, they have been stunningly successful in persuading courts to accept their argument.That sets up the inevitable collision of law and values and Christian conviction. In each of the cases listed above, the key issue is not a willingness to serve same-sex couples, but the unwillingness to participate in a same-sex wedding. Christian automobile dealers can sell cars to persons of various sexual orientations and behaviors without violating conscience. The same is true for insurance agents and building contractors. But the cases of pressing concern have to do with forcing Christians to participate in same-sex weddings — and this is another matter altogether.Photographers, makers of artistic wedding cakes, and florists are now told that they must participate in same-sex wedding ceremonies, and this is a direct violation of their religiously-based conviction that they should lend no active support of a same-sex wedding. Based upon their biblical convictions, they do not believe that a same-sex wedding can be legitimate in any Christian perspective and that their active participation can only be read as a forced endorsement of what they believe to be fundamentally wrong and sinful. They remember the words of the Apostle Paul when he indicted both those who commit sin and those “who give approval to those who practice them.” [Romans 1:32]The advocates of same-sex marriage saw this coming, as did the opponents of this legal and moral revolution. Judges and legal scholars also knew the collision was coming. Judge Michael McConnell, formerly a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit and now director of Stanford University’s Constitutional Law Center, suggested many years ago that the coming conflict would “feature a seemingly irreconcilable clash between those who believe that homosexual conduct is immoral and those who believe that it is a natural and morally unobjectionable manifestation of human sexuality.” Accordingly, he called for a spirit of tolerance and respect, much like what society expects of religious believers and atheists — what he called “civil toleration.”But the advocates of same-sex marriage are not friendly to the idea of toleration. One prominent gay rights lawyer predicted just this kind of controversy almost a decade ago when she admitted that violations of conscience would be inevitable as same-sex marriage is legalized. Chai Feldblum, then a professor at the Yale Law School, also admitted that her acknowledgement of a violated conscience might be “cold comfort” to those whose consciences are violated.But perhaps the strangest and most disappointing dimension of the current controversy is the entry of some Christians on the side of coercing the conscience. Writing in USA Today, Kirsten Powers accused Christians supporting such legislation of “essentially arguing for homosexual Jim Crow laws.” She explicitly denied that florists and bakers and photographers are forced to “celebrate” a same-sex union when forced to provide their services for such a ceremony.http://www.albertmohler.com/2014/02/24/caesar-coercion-and-the-christian-conscience-a-dangerous-confusion/last_img read more